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Rose feed

Discussion in 'Roses' started by MrDigwell, Sep 2, 2021.

  1. Plantpot

    Plantpot Gardener

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    Hi,

    This is the first time I will be planting out two climbing roses, a Perennial Blush and a
    Starlight Symphony. both open type and supplied bare root in November. I have already fitted wires and tensioner in the area they will grow, using post clamps. I will dig out the area and work in a good manure at the weekend so all I need to do is plant them.

    I take it that as they grow I can just tie them to the wires to grow in the direction I want and leave them alone until they need pruning, if any as they are not the rambling type ?

    Also is it best to use a rose feed or will blood fish and bone do, any tips about roses ?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Sheal

    Sheal Total Gardener

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    I know very little about climbers so can't advise you on their maintenance.

    Feeding is the same as for shrub roses. The manure will get them off to a good start and they won't need feeding before early summer next year. I give my roses their first feed just as they start to produce leaves, either with chicken manure pellets or blood, fish and bone - depending on what I have to hand. This helps growth. When they start to flower I feed with tomato food every 2/3 weeks instead which is better to keep the blooming.

    Don't forget to dead head to keep those flowers coming. :)
     
  3. ricky101

    ricky101 Total Gardener

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    A handful of FBB mixed into the planting hole is what we have always done.
    Manure is fine but it must be well rotted, fresh could burn the roots

    Importantly do soak the bare roots in a bucket of water for half to a hour and these days many say powder the roots with Mycorrhizal Fungi.

    They should arrive ready pruned, so doubt you will have anything to tie in until they get growing next year.
    Most good suppliers will provide a leaflet with planting and pruning guides.

    https://www.wilko.com/en-uk/wilko-best-rootgrow-mycorrhizal-fungi-150g/p/0330967
     
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    • Sheal

      Sheal Total Gardener

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      I've got four horses in a field as neigh-bours (not mine). I would be allowed to collect the manure but the field is so overgrown it's not worth searching through it. :)
       
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      • Perki

        Perki Total Gardener

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        Let them grow past the wires ( 2ft at least ) then bring them down to be tied in, I assume you are tying them to horizontal wires . Doing it this way will speed up the frame work of a climbing rose , tying them down continuously will slow the plant down. Morning is the best time to be tying / rearranging semi ripe woody plants
         
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