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Sarracenia - carnivorous plant!

Discussion in 'Other Plants' started by FlourishAnn, May 18, 2018.

  1. CanadianLori

    CanadianLori Total Gardener

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    I've ordered some pitcher plant and venus fly trap seeds and was wondering how difficult is it to get them to germinate?
     
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    • JWK

      JWK Gardener Staff Member

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      I've been unsuccessful myself trying to get seed to germinate, pete is your man:

       
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      • Mike Allen

        Mike Allen Total Gardener

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        Nigel also I believe has experience with these.

        I admit to having been fascinated by them, but I have never attempted growing them. Over the years, my wanderings in the New Forest, I came upon many sundews and using a magnifier, yes! they were so interesting.

        Then about a year ago, I was doing some research at the RBG Kew. When several foreign visitors, mostly of student age ended up beside me. From their appearance etc. I'd say they ere oriental. At this point. May I stress. I love people and do not discriminate. Actually I find that many orientals and Asians, really do have a great driving force to learn.

        Perhaps a bit rude of me, eavesdropping on their chatter. I first apologised for the interruption, then I introduced myself. Very soon others had joined the gathering. Honestly. It was such a wonderful few moments. Over the years I have engaged in bits and bobs of talks, lectures etc. To be honest. I find members of the Oriental and Asian races to be more respectful of the teache/lecture than the average european. To me. This episode really made my day.

        Perhaps outside of our hobby, pastime whatever. In our general day to day activities. Please. Let's not shun our foreign brothers and sisters. As people move around more, many sadly seeking a new land to live in. Please, smile. Say hello and get to know them.
         
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        • Selleri

          Selleri Koala

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          Venus fly trap seeds are in my opinion a totally disgraceful scam, they are impossible to grow and in 130% of cases end up in disappointment and tears. And they are marketed especially for kids to "spark their interest in gardening in a fun way". Rubbish. Abandon all hope now Lori. :mad:;)

          Good luck, let us know how you get on. @pete will probably have some good tips.
          [​IMG]
           
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          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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            Well,.... slightly reluctant to give advice here to be honest.:smile:

            I've only ever had good results with my own seed of sarracenia, but then I have only tried bought seed once.
            Not grown others from seed other than just wetted down a some moss peat, kept it damp and seen what has come up, mostly just sundews.

            Not tried venus fly trap from seed, its very easy to propagate by division if you buy a small plant.

            When growing sarracenia from seed I just sprinkled the seed on damp moss peat, that way the seedlings are easy to see when they germinate, they will be very small tiny pitchers in the first year, and I'd leave them, just making sure they never dry out by watering from below.

            In year two you might have something big enough to transplant, but I'd still use moss peat topped with live moss, although live moss will form on its own given time.
             
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            • CanadianLori

              CanadianLori Total Gardener

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              Thanks for the advice @pete. I'll look forward to the seeds arriving. I tried to order some plants, even offering to pick up since shipping in our climate at this time of year wouldn't work. No one is selling at the moment so that's why I ordered seeds. I'll get some moss peat. :)

              Oh, and forgot to say, I won't take it hard if it doesn't work out.
               
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              • pete

                pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                @CanadianLori , can I suggest you buy a few small plants from a supplier when the spring comes, you wont regret it, seed is a very slow way of producing these kinds of plants.:smile:

                Still, you dont know till you try, so hopefully the seed will come good for you.
                 
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                • CanadianLori

                  CanadianLori Total Gardener

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                  Thanks @pete. I did ask the plant people to contact me as soon as they have plants for sale. They said most likely mid spring as you say.
                   
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                  • NigelJ

                    NigelJ Total Gardener

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                    @Sian in Belgium
                    The Drosera (Honeydew, sundew) probably doesn't need repotting, I would snip off the finished flowers, if any. Mine die down in the autumn and then reemerge from the root in spring, although this year it has been so mild that several have not died down at all.
                    The pitcher plant if it has filled the pot I would repot into a larger pot using the same potting mix as you planted into. You can split them if you want; cut the thick root and gently pull apart making sure you have a growing point on each piece. I also remove dead leaves and pitchers and generally tidy them up.
                     
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                    • Sian in Belgium

                      Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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                      A year on, and I still love these year, our pitcher plant is about to flower. Should we let it, or is it better to remove the flower?
                       
                    • NigelJ

                      NigelJ Total Gardener

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                      @Sian in Belgium
                      I let mine flower with no ill effects. The flowers are interesting they have an aroma and look a bit like a searchlight on a pylon.
                      I don't seem to have ever had any viable seed. Flower arrangers love them.
                       
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                      • Sian in Belgium

                        Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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                        Oh good!
                        The flower is nearly open...IMG_20210812_172645.jpg
                         
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