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Tree I.D. Please

Discussion in 'Identification Area' started by shiney, Nov 16, 2021.

  1. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

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    upload_2021-11-16_4-33-13 (1).jpg
    upload_2021-11-16_4-33-58 (1).jpg

    Accurate id needs more info.
    Please note very few trees in UK turn red in the autumn...Beech/Ash certainly don't.
    Cherry does. (Rowan does..leaves wrong for Rowan)

    I believe there are Acers at the front/foreground and cherry in the distance.
    The leaves ringed in red are spot on for Acer...maybe Acer rubrum.

    Note the junction on the left...maybe Acer up as far as this and after it Cherries.

    The council will be able to tell you exactly what trees they are. ..contact Parks dept..
    Parks and green spaces | North Herts Council

    Leisure, culture and local heritage


    ACER  RUBRUM  OCTOBER  GLORY 18-09-2008 15-19-03.JPGACER  RUBRUM  SCHLESINGERI 18-09-2008 15-15-49.JPG
     
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      Last edited: Nov 18, 2021
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      A picture of the bark sometimes helps along with close ups of the branches and buds.
       
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      • The Buddleja Garden

        The Buddleja Garden Gardener

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        I can't tell much from the photos, to be honest.
        Recently, councils have been using Liquidambar (or Sweet Gum) trees for street planting - and there are several species, and several cultivars of some of those species. The leaves go all sorts of colours in the autumn, some gold, some types more red. The leaf-shape can be quite maple-like.
         
      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        As far as I can tell the maple "like" leaves have not gone red.
        The ones on the ground are just brown and the trees in question are yellow, or at least what is left of the autumn colour still on them.

        I cant think the red leaves on the ground came from the trees in the picture.
         
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        • Sheal

          Sheal Total Gardener

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          After zooming in again the points on the leaves and lack of serration suggest they are not Acers to me.
           
        • Macraignil

          Macraignil Gardener

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          I usually associate hornbeam trees as being more yellow leaved when they change colour before falling but on checking the images online there seems to be at least one variety that goes more of a red colour called Rockhampton red. Some variety of hornbeam would be my best guess at the identity of the trees producing the more frequently represented leaves on the ground but I would not rule out beech as another possibility.
           
        • Sheal

          Sheal Total Gardener

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          You may be right Macraignil. I can't see local councils either paying out for or planting Acers on public streets.
           
        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          Lots of Acers planted in the streets around here, mainly variants of sycamore.
          They do colour up bright yellow in most years.
           
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          • Silver surfer

            Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

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            I beg to differ.
            I think you would be amazed at the trees that councils are now planting.
            This is Lewisham.

            Species guidance — Street Trees for Living

            For narrow pavements (1.8m)
            • Acca sellowiana Pineapple Guava

            • Acer platanoides Columnare Maple

            • Acer pseudoplatanus Brilliantissimum Maple

            • Acer ginnala Maple

            • Acer griseum Paperbark Maple

            • Acer buergerianum Maple

            • Betula pendula Zwisters Glory Silver Birch

            • Cercis siliquastrum Judas tree
            • Chitalpa x tashkentensis Summer Bells Desert Willow

            • Ginkgo biloba Globosum Maidenhair

            • Ginkgo biloba Nanum Dwarf Maidenhair

            • Halesia Carolina Snow Bell

            • Hibiscus resi

            • Lagerstroemia indica Crepe Myrtle
              **
              only does well if south facing and with reflected heat, doesn’t flower every year**

            • Ligustrum japonicum Japanese Tree Privet

            • Ligustrum lucidum Chinese Tree Privet

            • Liriodendron tulipifera Fastigiata Upright Tulip Tree

            • Magnolia denudata Magnolia Yellow River

            • Magnolia Kobus Magnolia

            • Magnolia Merrill Merrill Magnolia

            • Sophora Japonica Japanese pagoda tree

            • Syringa Vulgaris Lilac - OUT OF STOCK

            • Tamarix Salt Cedar



            For wide pavements & soft verges (3m)
            • Acer Campestre Field Maple

            • Acer Campestre Elegant Field Maple

            • Acer Campestre Elsrijk Field Maple

            • Acer Campestre Lineko Field Maple

            • Acer Campestre Louisa Red Shrine Field Maple

            • Acer platanoides Norway Maple

            • Aesculus hippocastanum indica Indian Horse Chestnut

            • Carpinus betulus Columnare Hornbeam

            • Carpinus Fastigiata Upright Hornbeam
              **not in areas prone to subsidence**

            • Carpinus betulus Lucas Upright Hornbeam

            • Catalpa bignonioides Indian Bean Tree

            • Cornus mas - Cornelian Cherry

            • Gymnocladus dioica Kentucky Coffee Tree

            • Juglans nigra Black Walnut Tree

            • Juglans regia Persian Walnut Tree
            For medium sized pavements (2.4m)
            • Acer campestre Elegant / Elsrijk / Lienco / Queen Elizabeth Field Maple

            • Acer rubrum Red Sunset

            • Albizia julibrissin Persian Silk Tree

            • Alnus incana aurea Alder

            • Arbutus unedo Strawberry Tree
              **expensive so species provided will be smaller than usual or sponsor will need to pay the difference**

            • Betula ermanii Silver Birch

            • Betula Nigra River Birch

            • Betula pendula Silver Birch

            • Celtis australis Nettle

            • Cornus Contraversa Dogwood

            • Ginkgo Biloba Maidenhair
              **to be avoided by people with allergies**

            • Gleditsia triacanthos Sunburst Honey Locust

            • Ilex castaneifolia Chestnut-leaved Holly

            • Juglans regia Walnut tree

            • Keolreuteria paniculata Fastigiata Upright Golden Rain Tree

            • Ligustrum japonicum Japanese Tree Privet

            • Liquidambar Slender Silhouette Sweet Gum

            • Liquidambar styraciflua Worplesdon / Fastigiata Sweet Gum Worplesdon / Fastigiate

            • Liriodendron tulipifera Fastigiata Upright Tulip Tree

            • Pinus sylvestris Fastigiata Upright Pine

            • Tilia cordata Winter Orange Small Leaved Lime Winter Orange

            • Tilia mongolica Mongolian Lime

            • Keolreuteria paniculate Golden Rain Tree

            • Liquidambar styraciflua American Sweetgum

            • Metasequoia glyptostroboides Dawn Redwood

            • Parrotia persica Persian Iron Wood
            • Paulownia tomentosa Foxglove Tree

            • Platanus x hispanica London Plane

            • Pinus sylvestris Scots Pine

            • Quercus robur Fastigiata Koster Fastigiate Oak Tree

            • Tilia cordata Small Leaved Lime

            • Tilia cordata x Mongolica Harvest Gold Mongolian Lime

            • Ulmus carpinifolia Wredei Aurea – Golden Leaved Elm (disease resistant)

            • Ulmus New Horizon – Resistant Elm

            • Tilia cordata small leaved lime
            Prunus, Malus, Sorbus, Amelanchier, Crataegus and Pyrus all in short supply. LBL now states Prunus in soft verges only due to pavement damage.
             
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            • shiney

              shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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              Thanks @Silver surfer :) Very interesting :blue thumb:

              So not much choice then? :heehee:

              I'll see whether they are able to do a close up of a leaf taken from one of the trees.
               
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              • Sheal

                Sheal Total Gardener

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                That's quite a list Silver surfer. :) I've never lived in an urban area and the only trees I've seen on verges have been various types of Sorbus, Prunus or Malus.
                 
                Last edited: Nov 21, 2021
              • Victoria

                Victoria Lover of Exotic Flora

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                I am surprised some of those would live in the UK.
                 
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                • pete

                  pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                  I can't see anything in that list that is not reasonably hardy most of them are pretty much totally hardy in the UK, I would think. :smile:
                   
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                  • Victoria

                    Victoria Lover of Exotic Flora

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                    I was thinking of the Albizia and Cercis mostly, but also a couple of others. I know some grow them in certain areas where it is relatively mild and often molly coddle them, but I would not think of them as "street trees" there.
                     
                  • Macraignil

                    Macraignil Gardener

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                    I have two young Cercis growing here where it is not particularly mild and they are doing fairly well without any special treatment. The Cercis siliquastrum and the Cercis canadensis both have flowered a bit but are still small and have not been as spectacular as some of the pictures of mature ones I have seen. They have been slow growing but I've not noticed anything suggesting they have had problems with the climate here anyway.
                     
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