Ugly Plants and Flowers

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by alana, Jul 28, 2019.

  1. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    7,475
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    West Cornwall
    Ratings:
    +17,453
    Did you deadhead Nick? Crucial or such plants simply seed and die.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Nikolaos

      Nikolaos Super Gardener

      Joined:
      Jun 26, 2019
      Messages:
      470
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Midlands, UK
      Ratings:
      +831
    • alana

      alana Super Gardener

      Joined:
      May 5, 2008
      Messages:
      646
      Occupation:
      Head Gardener
      Location:
      Far East of Suffolk
      Ratings:
      +1,948
      Warning SEXIST REMARK coming up:-

      I'm of the opinion that women are more inclined to grow a plant for aesthetic reasons and grow flowers rather than vegetables. My observations are based on the membership of our local horticultural society. Our membership is about 50/50 male and female and at our recent members' summer show the winners of the vegetable classes were predominately male and the floral classes (apart from "larger than life" flowers and plants) female.

      My partner has no input in the choice of plants in our garden - his interest is in minimal in horticulture but he is happy to get involved in the "bricks and works" department. My flower beds and lawn are curvy and the flower colours are mainly pastel shades which would be the complete opposite if my husband had his way. In my working life as an open garden organiser I could always tell whether the main gardener was male or female by the choice of plants.
       
      • Like Like x 2
      • Informative Informative x 2
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • mazambo

        mazambo Super Gardener

        Joined:
        Sep 11, 2018
        Messages:
        722
        Gender:
        Male
        Location:
        Stoke-on-Trent
        Ratings:
        +1,229
        That's really interesting @alana in no way being sexist or demeaning, off the top of my head here, do you think that goes back to prehistoric times and the male need to provide? Just a thought.
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Selleri

          Selleri Super Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 1, 2009
          Messages:
          762
          Location:
          North Tyneside
          Ratings:
          +1,660
          A very good and true point, @alana . Especially in Northern European culture "productiveness", "size", "strong shapes" etc. are definitely seen as more masculine traits than say, gentle pastel shades. Perhaps it's easier to justify the need of creative aesthetics in a male world if you can refer to a specific detail that is considered masculine. And vice versa, the competitive cucumber growing female may feel easier if she describes the plants as "delightful" or the flowers as "lovely".

          (Disclaimer- most of us real people don't fall into stereotyped categories and feel insulted if any of our behaviours is hinted to fit into a category, any category. Most of us are fiercely individual, and hate to be categorised. Do NOT study sociology, ever. :old: )

          Coming back to ugly flowers, why would anyone grow Mullein? It's big, the foliage is not showy, and the flower stalk is nothing to write home about. Big and pale yellow, :wow: The best I can say about the plant is that the flowering period is thankfully short. My Grandmother loved it :)

          [​IMG]
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • Nikolaos

            Nikolaos Super Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 26, 2019
            Messages:
            470
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Midlands, UK
            Ratings:
            +831
            @alana I often think I can judge the gender of the gardener based on gardening style. Most ladies seem to prefer one similar to yours, but men typically tend to go for something more formal with plants placed equidistantly. I think men gradually have to learn how to adopt 'looser' styles like cottage gardening and perhaps the reverse is true with ladies and more formal styles. Of course there are always outliers but this is just a question of natural inclination. So I don't think your comment is at all "sexist". :)

            I do love informal planting and pastel shades, tho!

            Nicola :biggrin:
             
          • Nikolaos

            Nikolaos Super Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 26, 2019
            Messages:
            470
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Midlands, UK
            Ratings:
            +831
            @mazambo Wow, you read my mind, I was just about to type something incredibly similar, even intending to use the term "provider" for males!

            Nick
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

            Joined:
            Jul 3, 2006
            Messages:
            44,287
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Retired - Last Century!!!
            Location:
            Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
            Ratings:
            +74,346
            Agreed :heehee:

            You'd have a problem deciding in our garden! A good few dozen GC members have visited our garden and could attest to that. :blue thumb:

            Simple answer: we grow it for two reasons, one is for the habitat for the attractive caterpillar and the Mullein moth and the other (virtually the same reason) but it keeps the caterpillars off our Verbascum chaixii. Chaixii is short, usually 3ft-4ft high, comes in pastel colours with the stem solid with flower and is loved by bees and other pollinators. The white version come with pure white petals and a cerise eye. They flower for about 3-4 weeks and if pruned back usually give a second showing. They're always in great demand and we always sell out at our open garden. So, yes, there are attractive Verbascum. :dbgrtmb: Can't post any pictures as our main computer is down.

            If the seed heads are still on the stem then keep them like that and just stand them, dry, in a container (bucket is the simplest) and leave them. The bucket is to catch the seeds when they mature a bit more and may drop from the pods. They're a very easy seeder so just sprinkling them around when they're ready would be enough. We have the white and pink versions.
             
            • Like Like x 2
            • Informative Informative x 1
            • Verdun

              Verdun Passionate gardener

              Joined:
              Oct 16, 2012
              Messages:
              7,475
              Gender:
              Male
              Location:
              West Cornwall
              Ratings:
              +17,453
              Slightly off subject but we men have to tread carefully these days. I was brought up to offer my seat, open a door and generally offer support to the ladies...young or old.:)
              But, hey! It’s not what the (younger) females of today actually want, apparently :sad:
              My niece, 25, qualified accountant, good salary, drives an almost new AudiTT says a resounding no to all that. She says it smacks of undue deference to the still supposed weaker ladies and they don’t need or appreciate that. And, know what? I carried out a a bit of a “survey” and almost every woman under 30 said the same. Some actually giggled at the thought of such “chivalry” .
              The older ladies however still liked this gentlemanly behaviour. At yesterday’s garden fete, the ladies there loved the gentlemanly behaviour (of yesteryear)
              So, ladies.....what are we poor guys supposed to do?:noidea:

              As a male gardener I like curves and straight lines, pastels and strong colours, flowers and veg etc but I guess I do like plants big, strong and bold in preference to dainty ones. Preferring plants growing vigorously in the ground rather than contrived in containers that I think the ladies excel in. I think the lawn is still very much a man’s domaine.......stripes of course :)
              The same too for hedge trimming....is this still a male task?
               
              • Friendly Friendly x 2
              • Like Like x 1
              • Agree Agree x 1
              • Nikolaos

                Nikolaos Super Gardener

                Joined:
                Jun 26, 2019
                Messages:
                470
                Gender:
                Male
                Location:
                Midlands, UK
                Ratings:
                +831
                Thanks so much for that! :) @shiney I've already taken the seedpods which are tan-coloured and translucent off the stems, hope that isn't wrong! I'll pop the rest of the stems into a bucket as you advised. I know I could buy new seeds and that it sounds silly, but the seeds originally came from my late grandmother's garden so I have a bit of a sentimental attachment to those particular plants. I think I just sprinkled them in the border originally so it just shows you don't have to push them into the soil as the article I linked to said.

                Thanks again mate, hugely appreciated,

                Nick
                 
                • Friendly Friendly x 1
                • alana

                  alana Super Gardener

                  Joined:
                  May 5, 2008
                  Messages:
                  646
                  Occupation:
                  Head Gardener
                  Location:
                  Far East of Suffolk
                  Ratings:
                  +1,948
                  @shiney I haven't had the pleasure of visiting your lovely garden - yet - but judging from your postings, you and Mrs Shiney share the joys (and woes) of gardening. Do you agree on everything planted?
                  I have tried, over many years, to enthuse my husband with my passion for the garden to no avail. He likes to feed the fish, eat the fruit and have the occasional moan when I spend all my spare cash on plants. He does enjoy flower shows especially Chelsea and Malvern but his interest is in the machinery.
                   
                  • Like Like x 1
                  • mazambo

                    mazambo Super Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Sep 11, 2018
                    Messages:
                    722
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Location:
                    Stoke-on-Trent
                    Ratings:
                    +1,229
                    Ditto @Verdun I was brought up the same and still and always do that, it's rare but I still do get "Thank you you're a gentleman there's not many left"
                     
                    • Like Like x 2
                    • shiney

                      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

                      Joined:
                      Jul 3, 2006
                      Messages:
                      44,287
                      Gender:
                      Male
                      Occupation:
                      Retired - Last Century!!!
                      Location:
                      Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
                      Ratings:
                      +74,346
                      @alana


                      Of course we do! My most common two words are "Yes, dear." :lunapic 130165696578242 5:

                      I'm not sure what "spend cash" means :scratch:. We propagate all our own plants, use seeds, take cuttings etc. and when we see plants in other gardens that we like and haven't got we always ask for cuttings, seeds, roots bulbs etc. In over 50 years nobody has ever said no to us. Most are flattered, and some ask whether (or we offer) if there are any plants we can give them. We quite often see nice plants in the front gardens of houses and just knock on the door and ask. :dbgrtmb:

                      We still have some plants/trees given to us in the late 70's by Alan Bloom (founder of Bressingham Gardens - now run by his son Adrian) and we did a swap of plants (can't remember which ones apart from a Cedar that grows in a prostrate form). We've also swapped plants with Richard Ayres, designer of the winter garden at Anglesey Abbey. He's retired but opens his garden in Lode about three times a year, for charity, and it's worth seeing in his June/July opening - with a couple of other gardens in the village. I mentioned those two because they're near you.

                      The Verbascum chaixii (album) mentioned above was given to us by Beth Chatto in the late 60's :)
                       
                      • Like Like x 3
                      • alana

                        alana Super Gardener

                        Joined:
                        May 5, 2008
                        Messages:
                        646
                        Occupation:
                        Head Gardener
                        Location:
                        Far East of Suffolk
                        Ratings:
                        +1,948
                        @shiney - I do propagate my own plants and have many plants that have been given or swapped but if I see a beauty and I have the room I do succumb. It's my weakness:sad: but I believe that buying small plants and nurturing them to become splendid specimens is good investing. The plants, shrubs and trees in my garden are worth far more than the furniture in my home.

                        I've visited the gardens you mentioned. They are all wonderful and special for different reasons. If I had to choose a favourite it would be Anglesey Abbey's winter garden - truly magical:)
                         
                        • Like Like x 1
                        • Friendly Friendly x 1
                        • shiney

                          shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

                          Joined:
                          Jul 3, 2006
                          Messages:
                          44,287
                          Gender:
                          Male
                          Occupation:
                          Retired - Last Century!!!
                          Location:
                          Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
                          Ratings:
                          +74,346
                          @alana did you know that they do free guided tours of the winter garden? There is the normal tour but interesting tour, most days, guided by one of the volunteers and then a special tour less frequently of their private area where they develop and raise their unusual and rare snowdrops. The normal tour you can usually book when you arrive there (i think it's twice a day) but the special tour needs advance booking and you can check on the internet when that is. :dbgrtmb:
                           
                        Loading...

                        Share This Page

                        1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
                          By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
                          Dismiss Notice