What can I put in this gap in my flowerbed?

Discussion in 'Herbs and Wildflowers' started by Chrislisi1982, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. Chrislisi1982

    Chrislisi1982 Apprentice Gardener

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    So I have a space in my flowerbed for something new. I’m looking for:

    • evergreen
    • Non toxic for dogs or cats
    • Grows about 3ft high and 3ft wide (roughly!)
    • Easy to maintain
    • That spot has full sun during the afternoon and is shaded in the evening and morning as I have a west facing garden
    • Clay soil but I can obviously dig some of that out to put top soil in if needed
    Any suggestions in what could fit my list of requirements?![​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  2. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    So pretty much the perfect plant.:smile:
    When you find it, let me know,:biggrin:
     
  3. noisette47

    noisette47 Total Gardener

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    Cistus! The flowers come in large white, with or without dark blotch, ditto bright pink, ditto, and pale pink, ditto ditto. Leaves can be green, aromatic and sticky or like grey felt. They flower profusely for a short period in early summer, so growing a later-flowering climber over it will provide extra interest. Have a Google of C. ladanifer, C. cyprius, C. maculatus, and hybrids like Alan Fradd and Silver Pink
     
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    • Graham B

      Graham B Gardener

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      A few possibles which I've had in a previous heavy clay garden are...

      Hebe
      Ceanothus
      Ceratostigma
      Nandina
      Caryopteris
      Hedgehog holly (ilex ferox); theoretically can grow taller, but the growth rate is about 2-3" a year
      Curry plant
      Stachys
      Any number of dwarf cypresses
       
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      • Sheal

        Sheal Total Gardener

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        Lovely ideas but this is in the Herbs and Wildflowers forum. I'm no good with either so my only suggestion is Lavender. :)
         
      • Macraignil

        Macraignil Gardener

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        What about pittosporum tom thumb. Not very fast growing so its easy to maintain and the leaves have a really nice colour in winter.
         
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        • mazambo

          mazambo Total Gardener

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        • Graham B

          Graham B Gardener

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          Good point Sheal. I'd assumed this was a slight mis-posting, since they didn't say much about it having to be one of them.

          Most evergreen herbs are vaguely Mediterranean, so they don't respond too well to soggy British clay. Lavender and rosemary would generally fit the bill though, as long as they don't have permanently wet feet. I've known someone lose an entire lavender hedge in a very wet winter.
           
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