Wild Flower Or Weed

Discussion in 'Identification Area' started by wiseowl, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. shiney

    shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Messages:
    47,172
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired - Last Century!!!
    Location:
    Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
    Ratings:
    +83,529
    Rose bay willow herb :dbgrtmb:. Reddish flowers all the way up the tall stem and turning to white fluffy seeds that fly and spread everywhere.

    Aslo known as Fireweed as it was the first plant that spread rampantly across London after the Great Fire in 1666. I remember it well! :lunapic 130165696578242 5: :old:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • ARMANDII

      ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

      Joined:
      Jan 12, 2019
      Messages:
      46,290
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +95,648
      Yes, it's seen on a lot of disused industrial sites, along with Buddeia:hapydancsmil:
       
    • Fat Controller

      Fat Controller 'Cuddly' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

      Joined:
      May 5, 2012
      Messages:
      20,146
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Public Transport
      Location:
      At me 'puter, GCHQ Ashford Office, Middlesex
      Ratings:
      +36,237
      That's the one! The roadside verges in the area I used to live in were rife with them - but to be honest, they were a nice sight when travelling around.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • revin helen

        revin helen Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 13, 2005
        Messages:
        235
        Gender:
        Female
        Ratings:
        +36
        Didn't Japanese knotweed receive an RHS award of merit when it was introduced?
         
      • greenfingerslad

        greenfingerslad Apprentice Gardener

        Joined:
        May 20, 2013
        Messages:
        20
        Ratings:
        +10
        Looks like Veronica polita - the Grey Field Speedwell.
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Silver surfer

          Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

          Joined:
          Jul 25, 2010
          Messages:
          2,181
          Occupation:
          Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
          Location:
          PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
          Ratings:
          +2,395
          • Like Like x 1
          • greenfingerslad

            greenfingerslad Apprentice Gardener

            Joined:
            May 20, 2013
            Messages:
            20
            Ratings:
            +10
            I'd agree but in this instance it can only really be between V. polita and V. agrestis due to the length of the sepals - protruding past the corolla. And of these two species V. polita has a wholly blue flowers whereas V. agrestis generally has at least a white lower lip. Also the shape of the sepals in this case indicates V. polita as the sepals are oval and pointed as opposed to oblong.
             
            • Like Like x 1
            • Trunky

              Trunky ...who nose about gardening

              Joined:
              Apr 23, 2011
              Messages:
              2,925
              Gender:
              Male
              Occupation:
              Professional Gardener
              Location:
              East Suffolk
              Ratings:
              +10,723
              Revisiting an old thread here. In my herbaceous bed, I've allowed certain self-seeded wildflowers to establish (within limits), sometimes with quite pleasing results.

              Here, a small patch of sweet peas is surrounded by white campion and oxeye daisies. Works for me. :)

              001.JPG
               
              • Like Like x 4
              • honeybunny

                honeybunny Head Gardener

                Joined:
                Feb 15, 2013
                Messages:
                1,213
                Gender:
                Female
                Location:
                Ireland
                Ratings:
                +1,912
                now that is beautiful Trunky :dbgrtmb: and just goes to show how incorporating a bit of native flora into the garden can work out surprisingly well :thumbsup:
                 
                • Agree Agree x 1
                • ARMANDII

                  ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

                  Joined:
                  Jan 12, 2019
                  Messages:
                  46,290
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Ratings:
                  +95,648
                  Works for me as well, Trunky, and a garden after my own heart!!!!!!!:hapydancsmil::snork:
                   
                  • Like Like x 1
                  • Trunky

                    Trunky ...who nose about gardening

                    Joined:
                    Apr 23, 2011
                    Messages:
                    2,925
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Occupation:
                    Professional Gardener
                    Location:
                    East Suffolk
                    Ratings:
                    +10,723
                    Got some monster teasels in the garden this year, the spring rains brought them on a treat.

                    This one appeared in the corner of the veg patch, I left it there and it's now coming in to flower. Just out of curiosity, I measured the height. It's reached an impressive 8ft 7ins (2.6m). :)

                    007.JPG
                     
                    • Like Like x 6
                    • Phil A

                      Phil A Gardener

                      Joined:
                      Jan 23, 2019
                      Messages:
                      46,066
                      Ratings:
                      +14
                      A few good ones here this year too :) Will have to move into the carding business :biggrin: Keep @Jenny namaste happy :biggrin:
                       
                      • Like Like x 1
                      • longk

                        longk Total Gardener

                        Joined:
                        Nov 24, 2011
                        Messages:
                        11,191
                        Location:
                        Oxfordshire
                        Ratings:
                        +22,295
                        Soddin' teasels are a pain! When I moved here the garden was full of them (along with Aquilega, Forget me Nots and numerous other weeds). Don't they realise that being free does not make them garden worthy! Spent weeks digging them out and guess what - they used to put everything in the compost so when I used the compost to top up the soil (I was taking several bags of weeds and Day Lilies to the dump every day) I just reseeded them all.

                        I'm sick of looking at teasel in all the hedgerows around here so the last thing I want is them in my garden.

                        Rant over.
                         
                        • Like Like x 2
                        • Funny Funny x 1
                        • Phil A

                          Phil A Gardener

                          Joined:
                          Jan 23, 2019
                          Messages:
                          46,066
                          Ratings:
                          +14
                          I've made you a nice cup of tea :)
                           
                          • Like Like x 1
                          • Friendly Friendly x 1
                          • longk

                            longk Total Gardener

                            Joined:
                            Nov 24, 2011
                            Messages:
                            11,191
                            Location:
                            Oxfordshire
                            Ratings:
                            +22,295
                            I only drink Yorkshire!
                             
                            • Informative Informative x 1
                            Loading...

                            Share This Page

                            1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
                              By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
                              Dismiss Notice