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Worm casts on new lawn

Discussion in 'Lawns' started by jowwy, Oct 12, 2021.

  1. jowwy

    jowwy Gardener

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    Anyway of stopping them or at least reducing the amount thats appearing??

    Thanks
     
  2. hoofy

    hoofy Gardener

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    I think iron sulphate will help prevent them. I'm getting them too on my new lawn.

    Not sure if you should use iron sulphate on a new lawn though?
     
  3. JWK

    JWK Gardener Staff Member

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    It's the time of year. They are a sign that your lawn is healthy, the worms are doing good by taking down dead leaves etc into the soil and helping aeration. You can rake over and scatter the casts when dry.
     
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    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      I never like to kill worms.
      The casts do make the lawn muddy, but as JWK says, its that horrible time of the year.
       
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      • Black Dog

        Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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        Healthy worms make for a healthy lawn.

        Just leave them be, the grass will grow even better the upcoming year hiding any traces of the worms
         
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        • hoofy

          hoofy Gardener

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          The problem with them is that if they get squashed either underfoot or with the mower they leave a big bare circle of soil which is a perfect landing pad for weed seeds.
           
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          • Black Dog

            Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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            Do you by any chance have a picture of your problem? Can't imagine them as big as a cow pad
             
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            • hoofy

              hoofy Gardener

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              Not the kind of thing I would take a picture of but from recent memory I would say a squashed worm cast gives you a circle of bare soil around 60mm in diameter which is both unsightly and also an invitation to non desirable weeds and grasses.

              I believe lawn enthusiasts use a besom broom to scatter them when they've dried out.
               
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              • pete

                pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                Trouble is they rarely dry out at this time of the year.
                I only have a bit of grass, doesn't really get called a lawn, but I stay off of it as much as I can at this time of the year.
                Otherwise I get muddy.:biggrin:
                 
              • JWK

                JWK Gardener Staff Member

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                Well I do see the problem with worm casts, on my lawn each cast is about a couple of inches diameter, trouble is they are so numerous it's difficult not to tread on them and spread them about.
                 
              • jowwy

                jowwy Gardener

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                Ive been brushing them back in with a very hard bristle brush and its been all ok. So i will keep doing that.
                 
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                • Liz the pot

                  Liz the pot Super Gardener

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                  NutriFlo Casting 10L

                  I can’t comment on its performance as I’ve not tried it but on small lawns I like you tend to brush them.
                  Iron does deter but it’s short lived and you can’t keep repeating it.
                   
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