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£2,500 Fine for growing Japanese Knotweed

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Scrungee, Oct 25, 2014.

  1. Simon McGuigan

    Simon McGuigan Apprentice Gardener

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    Hahaha - yes - between the sheep and Ed Balls, you may have a chance!
     
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    • Spruce

      Spruce Glad to be back .....

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      We had a field with knotweed up by me which never had live stock in for years as soon as sheep were introduced, it was eaten so over two years its all gone.
       
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      • Simon McGuigan

        Simon McGuigan Apprentice Gardener

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        Very interesting, and I certainly wouldn't argue with that - I would question though whether perhaps the sheep have just been eating the stems and new growth, and would have expected that the root is still there - possibly spreading? As long as the sheep eat everything above ground, there will be no signs , but the jk could still be there and active.

        I have no idea having not seen the site, but would be very interested to take a look.

        Interesting and food for thought. Thanks
        Simon
         
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        • Spruce

          Spruce Glad to be back .....

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          Japanese Knotweed is used as animal fodder in the Far East and here in Britain it is known that cattle, sheep, horses, donkeys and goats graze the plant. Animals prefer the young shoots as they emerge in the spring and after about June the stems become rather woody. Grazing may reduce shoot densities and height but will not eradicate it fully.

          Grazing is therefore not an eradication tool but is helpful in suppressing the plant and reducing spread.
           
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          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            Animal grazing may be of use in restricting the spread of the plant. If the new shoots are always being eaten a lot of plants put all their strength into trying to grow more shoots and not into spreading their roots.
             
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