Azalea - After flowering

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Charlie, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. Charlie

    Charlie Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Messages:
    164
    Ratings:
    +0
    I have a mid sized potted Azalea 12 inches in diameter which had wonderful blooms, however now that its finished I dont know what is the best thing to do. First of all do I cut it back and if so where to? Second do I now put it outside? (it would have to still be in a pot as I live in a flat with a balcony)
    All the blooms left brown husks which I have pulled off but do I need to prune more?
     
  2. Paladin

    Paladin Gardening...A work of Heart

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    12,748
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired but still grubbing the soil.
    Location:
    Broadway UK
    Ratings:
    +768
    Hi Charlie,
    All I do with ours is dead head and prune back when it gets straggly. I collect pine needles, oak and beech leaves and use the mould as a mulch and feed,as I don't use peat in my garden.
    Only have one,too much trouble with the lime soil here :(
     
  3. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    28,965
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    joinery
    Location:
    Mid Kent
    Ratings:
    +31,590
    Charlie, is it an indoor type, usually sold as a house plant winter/spring?
    If so dont prune unless you need to, put it outside in shade and feed now and again, make sure it doesn't dry out at all.
    Later in the summer feed with tomato food occasionally, still keeping moist at all times and no hot sun.
    Leave outside as long as you can without getting it frosted, could be really late where you are, then bring indoors in a cool position, bright but still no sun.
     
  4. Charlie

    Charlie Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Messages:
    164
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks Pete and paladin, for responding. I did buy them as indoor 'pot mums' and they were inside in a garden centre. Having said that (I bought them in early June) they bloomed beautifully however very soon the buds that hadnt bloomed or had grown perhaps whilst I had them I'm not sure, started to to brown and soft and didnt bloom. Also the actual blooms themselves didnt last as long as I thought they should have, themsleves going brown and withered. I never let them dry out, they had plenty of light and werent overwatered. It was all too sudden if you see what I mean. I had to pull off all the dying blooms and rotting buds and in the process cut back on one alot of the greenery. The other two just have the buds off so to speak. Shall I now leave them out on the balcony, as they are, in the same pots and do as you say above? Or do you think they were just so forced that their life span was never designed to be long? I dont have the benefit of planting out in the garden but my balcony although very light doesn't actually get the full sun until about 1.30 pm which I suppose could be regarded as partial shade
     
  5. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    28,965
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    joinery
    Location:
    Mid Kent
    Ratings:
    +31,590
    Charlie, is this an azalea or a chrysanthemum? :confused:
     
  6. Charlie

    Charlie Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Messages:
    164
    Ratings:
    +0
    Sorry everyone I got in a muddle - early in the morning! It was the Azalea I wanted to know about and thank you all for the advice. The Pot Mums are another issue and I think Pete has answered the question in a private message - thanks Pete.
     
  7. coed

    coed Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2005
    Messages:
    12
    Ratings:
    +0
    If you have removed the husks then you need to do a very light prune on the extension growth of this year just to reshape and balance the plant ready for next year. Keep it on the dry side not too much water and give a feed of Phostrogen for a month. Bring into a cool conservatory before frosts and keep frost free.A little mulch of well rooted beech leaf mold will help keep the acididty level right.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice