Boycott peat!

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Nikolaos, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. Nikolaos

    Nikolaos Super Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2019
    Messages:
    535
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Midlands, UK
    Ratings:
    +1,003
    Sounds like one of the GW suggestions isn't very useful! Plus, isn't that stuff quite expensive? :noidea:

    Well, I have a very small garden (around 150 square meters, and that's including the patio!), heavy clay alkaline soil and don't really care for acid-loving plants, so I know it's quite easy for me to go (largely) peat-free. I think I'll try the turves alternative suggested by GW and just buy some horticultural manure to amend my soil, that should suffice in terms of making it loamier. :)

    I definitely think that's excusable Shiney, that's quite a cost and I wouldn't want to see it coming out of your commendable and generous charity donations, either! :)

    Re the petition I doubt it will reach enough signatures to be considered for a parliamentary debate, but I think it will reach enough for a government response. Considering all that has been said on this thread so far, probably the most desirable result! :biggrin:

    Nick
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • ARMANDII

      ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

      Joined:
      Jan 12, 2019
      Messages:
      44,424
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +91,021
      I'm not so sure, Nick, as there are quite a number of extreme Environmental organisations and individuals who don't garden and will sign their names to any petition.:dunno: However, in the present situation of the Virus crisis, I doubt very much that if the petition got to Parliament it would have a high priority. The irony of the Peat debate is that Ireland is still burning Peat in two of it's Power Stations and that supplied for UK Gardeners is a tiny fraction of what is being used by the Irish Energy Companies.:dunno::wallbanging::cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
       
      • Like Like x 2
      • Informative Informative x 2
      • ARMANDII

        ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

        Joined:
        Jan 12, 2019
        Messages:
        44,424
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +91,021
        You probably don't want to know, Lori, as it could ruin your appetite for a good while!!:hate-shocked::doh::heehee:
         
        • Funny Funny x 3
        • Nikolaos

          Nikolaos Super Gardener

          Joined:
          Jun 26, 2019
          Messages:
          535
          Gender:
          Male
          Location:
          Midlands, UK
          Ratings:
          +1,003
          Yes, I was horrified to discover that! I do think that when it comes to us gardeners it should be more about minimising use and not necessarily eliminating it, as Shiney does. Yes, it is a rather small fraction, roughly about 5% in Ireland from what I've read (not sure about the total that goes to UK gardeners as a whole), but this article is from 2008 so they may well have reduced the amount used for horticulture/gardening since then.

          Peat products: The manufacturer's view

          Nick
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • Friendly Friendly x 1
          • john558

            john558 Super Gardener

            Joined:
            Feb 14, 2015
            Messages:
            640
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Retired
            Location:
            Ramsgate, Kent
            Ratings:
            +1,552
            I use Coir 10 x parts to 5 x parts own Compost with no feed for seeds. For potting on I put some feed in the above mix. Works fine for me.
             
            • Like Like x 4
            • Informative Informative x 2
            • shiney

              shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

              Joined:
              Jul 3, 2006
              Messages:
              44,840
              Gender:
              Male
              Occupation:
              Retired - Last Century!!!
              Location:
              Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
              Ratings:
              +75,944
              Up until last year we were using about 6,000 litres a year :hate-shocked: but this year it will only be a fraction of that. :sad:

              As a slight balance to that, our garden is very wildlife and environment friendly (even have a gold award for that :pathd:) and we don't use any chemicals on the garden - but all plants for sale that are susceptible to vine weevil do get a dose of killer.
               
              • Like Like x 4
              • ARMANDII

                ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

                Joined:
                Jan 12, 2019
                Messages:
                44,424
                Gender:
                Male
                Ratings:
                +91,021
                According to the RHS in, a research document, for the UK use it's less than 1%:dunno::cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
                 
                • Informative Informative x 3
                • Sandy Ground

                  Sandy Ground Total Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Jun 10, 2015
                  Messages:
                  2,008
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Occupation:
                  Retd. D&D Engineer
                  Location:
                  Scania, Sweden
                  Ratings:
                  +4,573
                  Pet is something that is used here, so I decided to find out a few facts. The thing that I discovered is that there are quite a few inaccuracies in the video.

                  As an example. One company here "farms" at present around 47 000 hectares of peat, plus another 600 hectares for others. Next year, they will be farming roughly 48 000 hectares of their own ground. The reason? Peat grows (not something we read about!) and next year their acreage will be roughly 1 000 hectares more. The year after that, a similar size increase will happen. Therefore, on condition that it is managed correctly, peat is a renewable resource.

                  I'm willing to bet that the person that made the video cannot even name the 4 main uses of peat….:whistle:
                   
                  • Like Like x 2
                  • Agree Agree x 1
                  • pete

                    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

                    Joined:
                    Jan 9, 2005
                    Messages:
                    28,145
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Occupation:
                    joinery
                    Location:
                    Mid Kent
                    Ratings:
                    +29,797
                    As I understand it peat does grow, and is formed by the bases of party decomposed sphagnum moss, but at a very slow rate.
                    The stuff we are digging out has been thousands of years forming. :smile:
                     
                    • Agree Agree x 3
                    • shiney

                      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

                      Joined:
                      Jul 3, 2006
                      Messages:
                      44,840
                      Gender:
                      Male
                      Occupation:
                      Retired - Last Century!!!
                      Location:
                      Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
                      Ratings:
                      +75,944
                      does that mean that the peat in my bags of peat will get larger if I leave them alone?
                       
                      • Funny Funny x 2
                      • ARMANDII

                        ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

                        Joined:
                        Jan 12, 2019
                        Messages:
                        44,424
                        Gender:
                        Male
                        Ratings:
                        +91,021
                        You'd have to ask pete about whether or not peat will grow...........or is that ask peat about whether pete will grow?:scratch::doh::hate-shocked:
                         
                        • Creative Creative x 1
                        • Cuttings

                          Cuttings Gardener

                          Joined:
                          Feb 21, 2020
                          Messages:
                          172
                          Gender:
                          Male
                          Occupation:
                          Horticulturalist
                          Location:
                          Keynsham north Somerset
                          Ratings:
                          +486
                          Here lies the problem, people bang on about how destructive peat is, but lets look at the peat replacements, coco fibre or coir, both made from coconut, these grow in and around the Indian ocean, and other tropical regions, this stuff is washed in local water, to remove salts (i dont know if you have been to places in India, but the water aint clean), its then dried (to reduce the weight), fumagated to remove nasties, then flown half way around the world, not really enviromentally friendly.
                          Good news though, some compost companies are starting to insist, the ingredients in their compost must reach 3 criteria, it must be useful, sustainable and ethical, which means the use of coco fibre and coir is on the way out:yay:.
                          Some companies in the next few years will be adding the by product of Bio fuel. Maize is grown and harvested, the kernels are squashed, fermented, then squeezed. When this pulp dries it becomes fibreous, full of nutrients, and able to hold a fair bit of moisture, on its own this fibreous material is too rich in nutrients to plant straight in, so it will have to be mixed with other ingredients.
                          Currently this by product, some is turned back into fields, some is used to make multi fuel burner briquets, but there is still thousands and thousands of tonnes left. You will see this change happening over the next couple of years.
                           
                          • Informative Informative x 8
                          • Like Like x 2
                          • Susieshoe

                            Susieshoe Gardener

                            Joined:
                            Sep 18, 2013
                            Messages:
                            79
                            Gender:
                            Female
                            Location:
                            Llantrisant South Wales
                            Ratings:
                            +216
                            Dalefoot compost is completely peat free - it’s wool and bracken. It’s expensive but it’s well worth the price.
                             
                            • Informative Informative x 2
                            • ARMANDII

                              ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

                              Joined:
                              Jan 12, 2019
                              Messages:
                              44,424
                              Gender:
                              Male
                              Ratings:
                              +91,021
                              And that's what, unfortunately keeps it to a small market and users of small quantities.......gardeners using reasonable amounts can't afford to buy it and others that are supposed to be as good as peat added compost.:wallbanging::cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
                               
                              • Agree Agree x 4
                              • Like Like x 1
                              • CarolineL

                                CarolineL Super Gardener

                                Joined:
                                Jun 12, 2016
                                Messages:
                                768
                                Gender:
                                Female
                                Occupation:
                                Retired Software engineer
                                Location:
                                Rural Carmarthenshire
                                Ratings:
                                +1,767
                                As @NigelJ stated, Melcourt do composts based on composted bark. The National Botanic Garden of Wales (which is now closed and so I can't volunteer there any more :frown:) use it to avoid peat. I found the compost a bit more free draining than my usual peaty stuff - so it is better for people like me who overwater. Unfortunately it doesn't appear to be available in amateur quantities. So I'm afraid I get the cheapest stuff available, and add tons of grit.
                                 
                                • Informative Informative x 3
                                • Like Like x 1
                                • Friendly Friendly x 1
                                Loading...

                                Share This Page

                                1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
                                  By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
                                  Dismiss Notice