Chocolate Vine.

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Jocko, May 4, 2022.

  1. Jocko

    Jocko Guided by my better half.

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    We have two Akebia Quinata (Chocolate Vine) which we planted almost 3 years ago. Neither seems to be doing very great.
    I found this on Google:
    Managing Akebia chocolate vines is difficult because of how tough they are and how rapidly they spread. This vine grows happily in shade, partial shade, and full sun. It sails through droughts and survives freezing temperatures. In short, it can and does thrive in many different habitats.

    Ours are against a south-facing fence and are lucky if they have grown little more than a foot since we put them in. The boss is talking about moving them but I have suggested we give them another season where they are.

    Left hand Chocolate Vine 4-5-22.jpg

    Right hand Chocolate Vine 4-5-22.jpg

    This is one of our Clematis, planted last year which is positioned between them. It is growing fine.

    Clematis 4-5-22.jpg

    I am open to any thoughts and advice anyone may have to offer.
     
  2. Michael Hewett

    Michael Hewett Total Gardener

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    Mine took several years to settle in but then it became rampant and I have to keep cutting it back. I'm thinking of putting it in a pot to try and slow it down a bit. It is flowering this year for the first time ever.
     
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    • noisette47

      noisette47 Total Gardener

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      The leaves look a bit on the yellow side. I'd give it a good watering can-full of liquid ericaceous feed. As Michael said, they're slow to get going, but once they do, they're very enthusiastic :)
       
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      • Jocko

        Jocko Guided by my better half.

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        I was looking for a liquid ericaceous feed and the one I found (among many) was a seaweed extract. I have a bottle of seaweed extract in my potting shed so I thought I would use that.
        Today I carefully removed as much of the soil around both plant's roots as I could, I then sprinkled Rootgrow granules and backfilled with Organic Farmyard manure. I then soaked both plants with 2 gallons of seaweed extract solution.
        The first one above is nice and green but the second and "weediest" one of the two has a distinctive yellow tinge to some of the leaves.
         
      • Jocko

        Jocko Guided by my better half.

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        Today we lifted the weedy one and replanted it elsewhere. I was reading about planting and care and one pundit said to use a root barrier as they spread their roots like wildfire. The one I lifted had a small rootball (unless the rest was left in the ground). For a rampant invasive species mine appear to just be scouting the terrain! Today, I planted it using Rootgrow and backfilling with good quality loamy topsoil. We gave it a good soaking, a top dressing of Strulch (to keep the moisture in) and we will keep it well watered for the next few weeks. Here's hoping it goes rampant.
         
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