Confused About Horticultural "Grit"!

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Nikolaos, Apr 25, 2020.

  1. Nikolaos

    Nikolaos Total Gardener

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    Hi All,

    Very basic question, but can all types of horticultural grit be used interchangeably? Sometimes I simply see it labelled as "horticultural grit", sometimes "alpine grit" and other times as "potting grit" but is there any big difference? :dunno:

    Thanks,

    Nick
     
  2. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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    It's really all about putting grit into marketing categories, Nick. I use a lot of potting grit in my compost mix but, when at the Nursery, have problems seeing a difference between sacks of "horticultural grit", "potting grit", and Alpine Grit" and usually find the size of the different named grits is very much the same:dunno:, but that Alpine Grit is either multi-coloured or lighter in colour from the ordinary potting grit that I use.:cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
     
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    • Nikolaos

      Nikolaos Total Gardener

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      Thanks @ARMANDII, so just a case of "same grit, different names" then! :biggrin: Thought so, as I have both potting and alpine grit from the same company, but they look pretty much the same!

      Potting above and alpine below, can't really see any significant difference, the size difference is just due to me being closer when taking the second photo... :)

      Nick

      DSCN1259.JPGDSCN1260.JPG
       
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      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        I always use this stuff, it works for me.:biggrin:
        Old photo.
        May 10 029.jpg
         
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        • ricky101

          ricky101 Total Gardener

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          Think the keynote for any grit you use for plants is as shown on the pic above, it has to be lime free, thats why using any old 'building' gravel should be avoided as many contain limestone etc .

          When using Hort type grits and you have any really sensitive plants would suggest you rinse it first in running water, as some ph test we did, showed a high ph before the dust was washed out.
           
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          • ARMANDII

            ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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            I think using that brand, pete, must rub off because I can, at times, be a right one of those.:dunno::doh:
             
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            • CarolineL

              CarolineL Total Gardener

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              Hi All, I have found that alpine grit is more 'pointy' than the pictures above which look like miniature pebbles. I prefer the sharp stuff because I feel (possibly wrongly) that it will not settle and compact so much. Because of the difficulty of getting it, I bought a bulk bag of limestone grit. Despite its name, I have found that it is not really alkaline - the nice lady at Travis Perkins allowed me to shake up a sample in water and test the pH before buying it - and so far the plants are happy.
               
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              • Glynne Williams

                Glynne Williams Gardener

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                Used all the above (and others) for various purposes. CORNISH GRIT not the same. Think it rougher mix of a bone clay by product, containing mix of GRIT sizes AND a scattering of very fine clay particles which enrich composts with additional usable minerals.
                 
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