Enough room for a small weeping willow?

Discussion in 'Garden Projects and DIY' started by Iwang, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. Iwang

    Iwang Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi. I have a little planting area in my garden that I have finally decided to utilise. The dimensions are 1.15m x 0.85m. There is no concrete base so the roots of any plant/tree would have plenty of soil to utilise. Just to give you an idea of scale the whole garden is roughly 6 x 6m. On my daily walks I have seen small weeping willows (roughly about 5/6 foot in height) but also grow a similar size in length. I've no idea what exactly they are called but I have enclosed a photo. Don't want the tree to grow more than 2m in height incase I upset the neighbors! So firstly would an opening of 1.15m x 0.85m be sufficient for this plant to grow? To the back and side there is a fence so would need to trim any branches that would grow there - would this cause a problem for the general growth of the tree? As you can tell I'm a bit of a layman when it comes to gardening matters so would appreciate any advice- even what kind of tree or plant you suggest I should grow there.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. CarolineL

    CarolineL Super Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2016
    Messages:
    997
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Retired Software engineer
    Location:
    Rural Carmarthenshire
    Ratings:
    +2,354
    Hi @Iwang and welcome. I think the tree you mean is called a Kilmarnock willow. They are grafted which means the weeping top has been joined on to a tall stem combining 2 separate varieties of willow - the stem+root one and the weeping top. So that's why they don't grow any higher - the nurseryman decides at what height to chop off the straight one and attach the weeping bit. However you need to assume that the roots will take up approximately the same volume as the branches, and seeing the picture you sent, that is quite a lot of top growth on the tree! I think that bed is a bit too small for the needs of the tree. It will send its roots down (since there will be very little sustenance in that shallow a bed). IMHO I think such a tree would be (if it grew as big as the one you showed) quite a dominating effect in an enclosed garden.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

      Joined:
      Jan 9, 2005
      Messages:
      30,005
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      joinery
      Location:
      Mid Kent
      Ratings:
      +34,016
      I'm not sure what that is but I dont think its a willow in the picture.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • Sheal

        Sheal Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Feb 2, 2011
        Messages:
        30,968
        Gender:
        Female
        Location:
        Beauly, Inverness-shire
        Ratings:
        +37,774
        I agree with Caroline's comments and add that the tree wouldn't be able to spread it's crown so close to the fence.

        I don't think the picture shown is a Kilmarnock Willow, it could be Birch.
         
        • Agree Agree x 2
        • Sandy Ground

          Sandy Ground Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Jun 10, 2015
          Messages:
          2,076
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retd. D&D Engineer
          Location:
          Scania, Sweden
          Ratings:
          +4,779
          Just a thought, but why not try a Weeping Pear, Pyrus salicifolia Pendula? After flowering, they can be trimmed and kept to size. In my opinion, they also give a nice Mediterranean feel to the garden as well.
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • Iwang

            Iwang Apprentice Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 25, 2020
            Messages:
            4
            Gender:
            Male
            Ratings:
            +0
            Thanks for your detailed reply. I've always wondered how they can limit the hight- so at least I've learnt something new. With reflection I agree that the tree in question would be too big for my garden. The photos were taken of the trees in large detached gardens which really did look quite striking- but unfortunately wouldn't work for a smallish back garden. Back to the drawing board!
             
          • Iwang

            Iwang Apprentice Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 25, 2020
            Messages:
            4
            Gender:
            Male
            Ratings:
            +0
            Hi. Thanks for your advice - I've checked it out on it out online and it could possibly work. I certainly like the colour and the fact that it can be trimmed (and not as big as my original idea). What kind of soli would I need?
             
          • Sandy Ground

            Sandy Ground Total Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 10, 2015
            Messages:
            2,076
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Retd. D&D Engineer
            Location:
            Scania, Sweden
            Ratings:
            +4,779
          • Iwang

            Iwang Apprentice Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 25, 2020
            Messages:
            4
            Gender:
            Male
            Ratings:
            +0
            In the end I bought a 'Larix Kaempferi Pendula' - a small weeping conifer. Small enough to take its place quite nicely in that corner of the garden. Thanks for all the kind advice
             

            Attached Files:

          Loading...

          Share This Page

          1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
            By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
            Dismiss Notice