Gardening Aspirations For 2018

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by "M", Nov 26, 2017.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. clanless

    clanless Super Gardener

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2013
    Messages:
    998
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Gentleman of leisure.
    Location:
    North Wales
    Ratings:
    +2,125
    This year:

    Create new border in the back garden - thinking about planting some fruit trees;

    Sort out the front garden - make it bigger by getting rid of some driveway - install a low picket fence (home made not bought) - install a pathway to the front door (thinking stepping stones to match the rear patio) and then planting up. I'll post up some piccies as work progresses.

    We've decided on a low fence - so that people walking past can enjoy the display:spinning: and to prevent tea leaves from sheltering behind a high fence/hedge :th scifD36:.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • clanless

      clanless Super Gardener

      Joined:
      Jan 20, 2013
      Messages:
      998
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Gentleman of leisure.
      Location:
      North Wales
      Ratings:
      +2,125
      What a good idea :thumbsup:- these might be useful for my front garden project :smile:
       
      • Like Like x 3
      • Friendly Friendly x 1
      • Jack Sparrow

        Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Jul 24, 2017
        Messages:
        2,131
        Gender:
        Male
        Location:
        Peterborough
        Ratings:
        +4,117
        While I was reading about solar powered stones I also read about creating your own. All you need to do is to paint over a stencil using glow in the dark paint.

        Home made stones and hand painted designs could be quite effective.

        :snorky:

        G.

        I wanted to link to Sandy’s thread but I didn’t know how to.
         
        • Like Like x 2
        • Informative Informative x 1
        • Useful Useful x 1
        • ARMANDII

          ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

          Joined:
          Jan 12, 2019
          Messages:
          41,841
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +218
          If you're going to dig out a Bog Pond, lucius, then I would line it with pond liner which has got holes punched into it.......Advice from the RHS..........

          "Suitable for...



          Small areas are generally easier to create and maintain as a bog garden. Larger areas need to have stepping stones or walkways incorporated into the design to allow access for maintenance.

          Creating a bog garden is an ideal method for converting an existing garden pond, or adding a bog area to the edge of a new pond, as the same pond liner can be used underneath the bog garden to create waterlogged conditions. Holes are pierced into the liner and a layer of gravel placed in the bottom to allow for some drainage, so that conditions are waterlogged without pooling.



          When to make a bog garden


          A bog garden can be constructed any time, but winter is quite a good season for ‘extra’ projects such as this, as there is generally less other work competing for attention in the garden, and you will be ready to plant up your new bog garden in the spring.





          Making a bog garden


          Bog gardens can be made around the edge of a pond, or used as a feature in their own right.

          Making a stand-alone bog garden
          • Mark out the chosen area with sand or string
          • Given that you will need to excavate this area to a depth of 45cm (18in), calculate approximately the volume of soil you will need to shift (length x width x depth). If this seems excessive, consider reducing the size of the area
          • Excavate the chosen area to 45cm (18in) and put the soil aside
          • Line the hole with polythene sheeting or butyl pond liner at least 0.5mm thick. Place bricks or stones on the edge to stop it shifting as you walk on it
          • Pierce the liner at 1m (3¼ft) intervals with a garden fork
          • Lay a length of leaky hosepipe or porous pipe in the bottom, and seal the far end. The other end needs to come up and out of the bog garden so that it can be used to apply water for irrigation
          • Cover the bottom and the leaky hose with a 2.5-5cm (1-2in) layer of coarse grit or gravel to prevent soil blocking the holes in the pipe
          • Replace the excavated soil, removing any weeds and large stones in the process. If the soil is low in organic matter, incorporate compost, leaf mould or well-rotted manure
          • The soil level will now be higher than the originally, but it will settle in time. Only flatten the soil lightly, as heavy compaction will result in poor growing conditions. Continue to weed the soil as it settles further
          • Once the soil has settled back to its natural level, the bog garden is ready for planting.
          Making a bog area on the edge of a new pond
          • Mark out and excavate the total area of the pond and bog garden, leaving a ridge of soil between the pond and bog garden areas that is 7.5cm (3in) lower than the edge of the pond
          • Line the pond first, and then the bog garden, with sand and geotextile
          • Place a waterproof butyl liner over the whole pond and bog garden area, weighing down the edges to stop them moving greatly
          • Fill up the pond to just below the level of the ridge between the pond and bog garden areas
          • Put a 5cm (2in) layer of coarse grit or gravel in the bog garden area, for drainage, and partially fill it up with soil
          • Build a barrier of rocks or stones between the pond and bog garden, along the interconnecting ridge
          • Place a layer of fine plastic mesh along the back of the stone wall, on the bog garden side
          • Finish filling the bog garden with soil, until it is level with the surrounding soil
          • Add more water to the pond. Water will seep through the mesh and rock wall into the bog garden
          • Disguise the edges of the liner with stones and pebbles, creating a beach effect at the edges of the pond and bog garden
          • Allow the soil to settle for a few days and then plant up the bog garden


          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]
          [​IMG]


          STEP 1: Mark out area for bog garden.
          Problems


          If you have an area of your garden that is naturally waterlogged all year round, you may not need a liner to create a bog garden. However, be aware that bog garden plants do need some drainage and air around their roots. They will not thrive where the soil is so wet or compacted that water pools on it and little drainage occurs.

          Where plants are too waterlogged, they may suffer from Phytophthora root rots and other fungal diseases.

          As you said, lucius, my Bog garden is integral to my pond, but placing yours next to the pond is an ideal way to attract more Wildlife and also provide cover from them. My Frogs tend to hide in the undergrowth of the Bog Garden more than they do on the other three sides to the pond although there is plenty of cover on all three.

          I think where you are, WeeTam, you have more of a problem with Midges than we do further South:dunno: To be honest, in the Spring, Summer and Autumn I quite often sit by the Pond with a Mug of Tea, or a glass of Glug, Glug, Whoo!:Wino:, and have never been bothered by Midges.:snorky:
           
          • Like Like x 3
          • Informative Informative x 1
          • Friendly Friendly x 1
          • luciusmaximus

            luciusmaximus Total Gardener

            Joined:
            Apr 18, 2014
            Messages:
            2,459
            Gender:
            Female
            Occupation:
            Lost in the Wilderness
            Location:
            Isle of Anglesey
            Ratings:
            +4,892
            @ARMANDII thanks for the information :). I was going to make the Bog garden in front of the pond and at the foot end. However, when I started digging the first 3 shovels full contained worms, several in each shovel and lots of baby worms. I very carefully picked them out and relocated them. Then I realised there was just too many. So, I decided it would be prudent to leave the wormies in peace. I have just added some top soil and compost to that area now so I can still plant there. Not sure where I can put the Bog garden now. Maybe off to the side a bit, but will still have the same problem with disturbing worms. Later on, I made a start on digging out weeds and grass next to the boundary wall ready for planting hedging and again the earth was full of worms, so I think I will have to adopt the no dig approach here too.

            IMG_20180204_1438298_rewind.jpg
             
            • Like Like x 3
            • Friendly Friendly x 1
            • Jack Sparrow

              Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

              Joined:
              Jul 24, 2017
              Messages:
              2,131
              Gender:
              Male
              Location:
              Peterborough
              Ratings:
              +4,117
              Today I saw agapanthus roots (or However they come) in a packet in the bulb section of my local garden centre. I was wondering whether they would grow in front of my hedge. In the summer they would be in the sun virtually all day. I currently have the bed marked out for the lamium plants. I could replace a couple of the nettles with a couple of agapanthus.

              Fully grown agapanthus plants are quite expensive. It would be nice if I could start my own.

              G.
               
              • Like Like x 1
              • Informative Informative x 1
              • Jack Sparrow

                Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

                Joined:
                Jul 24, 2017
                Messages:
                2,131
                Gender:
                Male
                Location:
                Peterborough
                Ratings:
                +4,117
                • Like Like x 1
                • Informative Informative x 1
                • Jack Sparrow

                  Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Jul 24, 2017
                  Messages:
                  2,131
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Location:
                  Peterborough
                  Ratings:
                  +4,117
                • "M"

                  "M" Total Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Aug 11, 2012
                  Messages:
                  18,616
                  Location:
                  The Garden of England
                  Ratings:
                  +31,871
                  Passion flower is suckering. This means it will throw up suckers where you least expect them and may not even want them! A glorious piece of work, for sure! But, those suckers can pop up metres away from the parent plant and can, just "might", be a booger to get rid of: just saying! :whistle:
                   
                  • Like Like x 2
                  • Jack Sparrow

                    Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Jul 24, 2017
                    Messages:
                    2,131
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Location:
                    Peterborough
                    Ratings:
                    +4,117
                    Today I had a look around a small local nursery I hadn’t visited before. They had a couple of flamingo trees in stock. They look in good condition and stand approx 6ft high. That’s roughly the size I would prefer it to stay. The tree costs £24.99. From the same place I can also get a large plastic tub (approx 18” across) for £10. I was told that those trees wouldn’t be replaced once sold. I don’t know why that should be the case. I’m not sure but I think I might have to take the plunge.

                    G.
                     
                  • Jack Sparrow

                    Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Jul 24, 2017
                    Messages:
                    2,131
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Location:
                    Peterborough
                    Ratings:
                    +4,117
                    How hardy is abutilon megapotamicum? Would it survive average winters in an outdoor container against a wall?

                    G.
                     
                  • Verdun

                    Verdun Passionate gardener

                    Joined:
                    Oct 16, 2012
                    Messages:
                    6,231
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Location:
                    West Cornwall
                    Ratings:
                    +13,738
                    Solanum album ...the white form....is an excellent vigorous climber that flowers for months. Easy to control and semi evergreen....evergreen down here. Poisonous? I think it may be but prob no more than most everything we grow in our gardens. Children need to be educated about this. If we grew everything potentially toxic we would grow very little. (If a child sees us pick and cook rhubarb how does it know we should not eat the leaves???)
                    (I am more concerned about yuccas and other needle sharp plants that will take an eye out in a "blink of an eye".....none of these in my garden :nonofinger:)
                    No need to be nervous of planting climbers. They cover fences and walls, provide privacy :)and cover for birds and animate the garden. I am currently planting climbers in a new build ....the first things to plant there I think.
                    The classiest climber in my opinion is trachelospermum......not too vigorous, evergreen and scented white flowers. A lovely thing
                    Climbers like scented honeysuckle....there are some evergreen varieties......are easy and indispensable I think. Not all honeysuckles are scented so do some research

                    The varieties of black elder are so very similar.....they do NOT NEED to be cut down every year. I do this because it provides better quality foliage. For flowers and foliage, pruning every 2 years to the base or pruning selected branches is the way to go.
                    On its own, sambucus Black Lace and similar can look boring I think; planting a yellow perennial,shrub, a grass with it makes a fine impact. Or a blue eucalyptus with it for a stunning contrast.
                    Far better foliage is Cotinus Royal Purple, the very best purple shrub.
                     
                    • Like Like x 2
                    • Verdun

                      Verdun Passionate gardener

                      Joined:
                      Oct 16, 2012
                      Messages:
                      6,231
                      Gender:
                      Male
                      Location:
                      West Cornwall
                      Ratings:
                      +13,738
                      Gary, we crossed there.
                      "Flamingo" trees? Acer or salix?
                      Abutilon meg? Here it is hardy, evergreen and with some flowers still. However, it is regarded as half hardy in most places. Grow it in sun with good drainage....although it will still need some moisture in summer. If you like this plant consider a fleece cover in winter.
                      In a container it will not be as impressive or as vigorous and more exposed to frost :sad:
                       
                      • Like Like x 1
                      • Jack Sparrow

                        Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

                        Joined:
                        Jul 24, 2017
                        Messages:
                        2,131
                        Gender:
                        Male
                        Location:
                        Peterborough
                        Ratings:
                        +4,117
                        Salix.

                        The abolition I just happened to com across online. I am looking for something to add a bit of colour to the front of the house. I once tried a pyracantha. It didn’t take very well. It might do better now I have an understanding of what I’m doing. Whatever I go for, it will have to live in a container and be exposed to the weather.

                        G.
                         
                        • Like Like x 1
                        • Verdun

                          Verdun Passionate gardener

                          Joined:
                          Oct 16, 2012
                          Messages:
                          6,231
                          Gender:
                          Male
                          Location:
                          West Cornwall
                          Ratings:
                          +13,738
                          Pyracantha has a lot going for it but not child friendly.....or adult friendly come to that. It has long vicious barbs and for that reason I removed mine.
                          Not great for a container....it needs a good depth of soil

                          Salix Flamingo is really nice....I have a couple here. Pink, cream, white and silver green leaves make for an eye catching plant. Who needs flowers when you have this. One is grown here with a purple perennial.....persicaria Red Baron....and contrasts well I think. Easy to grow.
                          One thing...is this a half standard or a bush? Much better as a standard with a bare leg. grown on a leg enables planting below it
                           
                          • Like Like x 2
                          Loading...
                          Thread Status:
                          Not open for further replies.

                          Share This Page

                          1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
                            By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
                            Dismiss Notice