How many cuttings to new plants

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by johnboy, Jul 2, 2024.

  1. johnboy

    johnboy Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2024
    Messages:
    11
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2
    Hi,
    Just started taking some cuttings for the first time, this might seem a silly question but is it one cutting to each new garden plant or do some plants require more than one cutting.
    John.
     
  2. AnniD

    AnniD Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2024
    Messages:
    212
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    Ratings:
    +426
    No such thing as a silly question John (if there is, I've asked a few in my time !).
    What sort of plants are you taking cuttings from ?
     
  3. johnboy

    johnboy Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2024
    Messages:
    11
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2
    Hi AnniD,
    Ivy and Fuchsia are two not sure what the other two are called.
    John.
     
  4. AnniD

    AnniD Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2024
    Messages:
    212
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    Ratings:
    +426
    Say you take 3 or 4 cuttings from one fuschia plant, you would in theory get 3 or 4 new plants and the same applies to the ivy.
    Of course there are lots of factors to take into account, sometimes only one out of three will "take" (succeed) or sometimes it can end in failure.
    Hope I've understood your question correctly :smile:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • flounder

      flounder Super Gardener

      Joined:
      Apr 26, 2020
      Messages:
      912
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      RETIRED!!
      Location:
      Brighton
      Ratings:
      +1,855
      The way I read the question, if you planted say, three rooted cuttings in the same pot and grew them on to plant out, it would make it look a bushier plant and look established earlier. Sometimes, with hederas and fuchsias, a single stem looks pants until it's established
       
    • johnboy

      johnboy Apprentice Gardener

      Joined:
      Jul 1, 2024
      Messages:
      11
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +2
      Hi AnniD,
      Can i assume that one cutting should be enough for each new plant providing it roots ok?.
      John.
       
    • AnniD

      AnniD Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 13, 2024
      Messages:
      212
      Gender:
      Female
      Location:
      Gloucestershire
      Ratings:
      +426
      In theory yes, but as @flounder says, you can put several into one pot and grow them on to look like one bushy plant.
       
    • johnboy

      johnboy Apprentice Gardener

      Joined:
      Jul 1, 2024
      Messages:
      11
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +2
      Hi flounder,
      I think your right in what your saying, I was wondering if there is a set rule as to how many cuttings need to go into each new plant or do people have different ways of producing new plants, hope you can understand what i am getting at.
      John.
       
    • Butterfly6

      Butterfly6 Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 14, 2024
      Messages:
      350
      Gender:
      Female
      Occupation:
      Keeping busy
      Location:
      Birmingham, top of a hill facing East
      Ratings:
      +480
      No set rule. We all probably do things differently depending on what plants and what we are doing cuttings for.

      I tend to assume each cutting (if successful) will be one plant.

      Having said that, I’ve just potted on some supermarket growing Thyme. There were so many individual seedlings, I’ve planted them in small clumps and will treat each clump as a small plant. I might do the same with my oregano cuttings to get a “bigger plant” more quickly
       
    • waterbut

      waterbut Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 15, 2024
      Messages:
      97
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Retired
      Location:
      Portsmouth
      Ratings:
      +103
      Talking of cuttings. My last pot of French Tarragon suddenly died so bought a new potted plant. Has anyone had any luck growing cuttings from stems. My search engine says it is nearly impossible to grow plants from stem cuttings. Also what would be the best month for taking cuttings as I live on the South Coast? However you would think I was back in Scotland the weather I am having today.
       
    • Pete8

      Pete8 Gardener

      Joined:
      Aug 29, 2017
      Messages:
      363
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Retired
      Location:
      Billericay, Essex
      Ratings:
      +766
      French Tarragon is best propagated from root cuttings which are very easy.
      Around late Feb/March take your plant out of its pot.
      There will be some quite thick pale roots with little bumps on them.
      Cut lengths about 2-3" long, lay them horizontally it in a pot or tray with compost and cover the root with about 1" compost and keep it slightly damp..
      Within a few weeks you should see several new plants growing from each bit of root.

      French Tarragon loses it's flavour after 2-3 years, so use the above method to refresh your stock of plants.

      They grow best if planted in good soil in the garden, but they grow ok in pots.
       
      • Informative Informative x 2
      • Obelix-Vendée

        Obelix-Vendée Keen Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 13, 2024
        Messages:
        642
        Gender:
        Female
        Occupation:
        Retired
        Location:
        Vendée, France.
        Ratings:
        +1,700
        That's good to know @Pete8 I didn't know they lost flavour as they aged.

        My French tarragon in the wee raised herb bed died this winter so I bought a new one, potted it up and grew it on till I could get my herb bed cleared of bindweed, rampant fennel and a few other weeds. All done now with a new oregano too as that copped it.

        I also planted another tarragon in the polytunnel as insurance and it is doing very well.

        @johnboy there are no guarantees with cuttings so I always take several from a plant to up the percentages and increase the likelihood of success. Once I know a cutting has rooted I find it best to pot up each one in a small pot in good compost so it can develop its own strong root system.

        After that, it depends on the cuttings you're growing and the eventual size of a plant as to whether you plant 1 to a bigger pot or 3 or more to get more impact. You can always swap any spares with family, friends and neighbours.
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Agree Agree x 1
          Last edited: Jul 3, 2024
        • waterbut

          waterbut Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 15, 2024
          Messages:
          97
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired
          Location:
          Portsmouth
          Ratings:
          +103
          Thank you Pete8
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • johnboy

            johnboy Apprentice Gardener

            Joined:
            Jul 1, 2024
            Messages:
            11
            Gender:
            Male
            Ratings:
            +2
            Thanks for all the advice guy's ,
            Much appreciated.
            John.
             
          • flounder

            flounder Super Gardener

            Joined:
            Apr 26, 2020
            Messages:
            912
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            RETIRED!!
            Location:
            Brighton
            Ratings:
            +1,855
            Just seen your post, sorry for late reply!
            I always (mostly) plant in odd numbers. 3, 5 or seven cuttings to a pot, 3 pots planted in a triangle. It makes your eyes see bigger plants rather than individual pots. If people don't believe this phenomenon, try it. if it doesn't work for you...haha, gotcha...if it does, which it does, you'll see it looks better:)
             
          Loading...

          Share This Page

          1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
            By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
            Dismiss Notice