How to stake up these....?

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by clum111, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. clum111

    clum111 Gardener

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    Hi All.

    The front garden on my house faces a park, so it's very open and the winds just bust past. I've 5 of these long slender leaf plants (can't remember the name) planted in the raised beds, but the winds have been pushing them over a bit. How can I support the root balls, so the wind can't push them?

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  2. Sheal

    Sheal Total Gardener

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    I'm not sure from your picture whether that's a Phormium or Cordyline, the treatment would be the same though. You wont be able to support the roots but I suggest shortening a round tree stake and banging that into the ground close to the plants leaning side, after bringing it upright.
     
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    • clum111

      clum111 Gardener

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      Thanks Sheal, I did wonder about those.
       
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      • Verdun

        Verdun Passionate gardener

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        I would dig it up and replant. Then firm the soil around it using your heel.(if planting back into the ground) I did just this a few weeks back with a Cordyline growing in a pot.....planted deeper into a bigger pot. The roots are quite shallow in comparison to the top growth.
        I also wonder if it is in the right spot! It grows pretty fast once established but will grow well in a pot and remain smaller for longer. :)
         
      • KFF

        KFF Total Gardener

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        I agree with @Sheal , I don 't really agree with digging plants up after they're established just for the sake of it.
         
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        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          I find cordylines pretty wind tolerant.
          My only thoughts would be that maybe they were potbound when planted and are struggling to get a good roothold, once they do not much moves them.
          Think I'd just put some canes in, at an angle, on the side that they are being blown to as support until they get a good root hold.

          I've never found they move well, once in the ground they make a tap root, and that's where the stability comes from.IMO:smile:
           
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          • Sheal

            Sheal Total Gardener

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            I'm sorry Verdun but I disagree. If the plant is dug up and replanted it will completely loosen the roots and the problem will remain. By staking it the plant will have a chance to get a firmer grip than it has now. I had one in a previous garden completely open to a coastal west wind funnelled up through a ravine. So support is was it needs until it is properly established.
             
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            • Mike Allen

              Mike Allen Total Gardener

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              Normal practice of providing plant/tree supports is to place the support stake etc in situ prior to planting. In this case the top growth is much greater than the root system, so until the plant becomes really well established and produces more young shoots, much strain is put on that reduced area between foliage and roots. Various methods can be tried.

              I see no problem with replanting, perhaps planting deeper and say using stones or grit so as to enable the roots to delve deeper. Perhaps a commercially available stout wire support will do. These are made in circular or half circle, usually three pronged. I use these for supporting irises and montbretia even at times gladioli. Most garden centers stock them.
               
            • Sheal

              Sheal Total Gardener

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              But Clum111 will still have the same issue with wind rock Mike. And I would say it's not usual to stake a Cordyline on planting.
               
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              • Mike Allen

                Mike Allen Total Gardener

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                Sheal. I agree. NO staking certain plants might not be the norm. However your second part, windrock. Using a shaped device as I mentioned. In this case. The plant is one that has greater above ground than below spread. How can I explain this. Diagrammetrically the plant basically is 'V' shaped. The base of the V is the vunerable point. This is where foliage meets short stem and roots.
                By hook or by crook there are all methods available. My reference and support of the wire frame is this. The plant as I say is V shaped. Starting at ground level. This is the weakest part of the plants struchture. Perhaps another illustration. Take a length of wire or metal and start to bendit back and forth. Soon a weak point will emerge. Continued fatigue at this point will finally bring about a seperation either side of the break. So in an attempt to avoid or prolong the 'Break' the operative force has to be controlled or done away with. This in turn slows down, weakens and evn may stop further fatigue.

                Back to our plant. Its is still that 'V' sgape along with all its short-comings. Now if you can reduce the climatic, wind pressures etc from causing the foliage to blow about causung much the same effect as,the bending etc of the wire etc. This in turn restricts the pressue upon the rootstock. Hope this helps.
                 
              • Verdun

                Verdun Passionate gardener

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                Sheal, I will post a picture of my replanted cordyline over the Easter weekend.:) Since clum’s is small it will easily move. I also think a staked cordyline looks wrong as well as being inadequate in a couple of years or so when much taller:noidea:
                Rocks or stones won’t help situation either. Staking a cordyline at planting time is not appropriate.
                I also agree with Pete that the plant may have been rootbound when planted. Again, replanting it, at this size, would help rectify that.
                Cordylines grow everywhere down here and I have moved several but because they grow so fast they do need good anchorage from the start.
                Try it Clum, esp as I think it is growing in the wrong place...they need space to grow. let us know how it goes. :)
                 
              • Sheal

                Sheal Total Gardener

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                @clum111 I apologise if you think this post has disrupted your thread but I need to make some things clear to members here.

                @Mike Allen and @Verdun. From your replies I can't help feeling you are treating me as a novice gardener, not only on this thread but elsewhere too. So a little of my history for you.

                I have been gardening for the best part of 40 years, self taught through hands on experience. I have found it unnecessary to read gardening books but will request help for knowledge of new plants and gardening experiences if necessary. During these 40 years and having moved from the south east of England, I spent 24 years living in one of the windiest and wettest places in Britain, that place being the Isle of Man. Cordylines grow throughout the island being a mild climate. I moved here to the Highlands two and a half years ago and currently live in an exposed rural area 500ft above sea level. So despite you thinking I have little knowledge of wind rock and how to treat plants that suffer from it, I have had my share of dealing with plants in this situation including Cordyline. So I reiterate that I find staking is the best way, particularly as you say Mike, when the plant is top heavy.

                I haven't mentioned anything about rocks or stones but ironically I am currently gardening on sandy loam over bedrock. I have experience of gardening with all types of soil except chalk.
                 
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                • Verdun

                  Verdun Passionate gardener

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                  I was referring to Mike’s post Sheal and to my own experience with cordylines. They grow like weeds down here and I guess therefore take moving them etc for granted.....not when well established of course when they do eventually establish a tap root.
                  Sorry if you think I maligned you in any way.:)
                  My experience of staking cordylines was when I staked a 8’ cordyline growing on the coast in view of St. Michaels’s Mount ......bearing the brunt of some pretty strong winds.....and it was unsuccessful despite using a trio of strong wooden poles. I hated the look of it in any case and ended up replacing it. I’m sure staking does work...it didn’t in my case. Cordylines look great in howling winds if anchored well I think without the incumbrance of staking.
                  Last autumn a cordyline growing in a container was loose and suffering from wind rock. I replanted in a deeper container and it is now firm and solid after a pretty breezy winter.
                  The beauty of the forum is in our individual experience .....we can share, argue, debate, etc., as much as we like yet some things uniquely work for us and some don’t. :)
                   
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                  • Mike Allen

                    Mike Allen Total Gardener

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                    Sheal my dear friend whatever has caused this upset. As a forum member and hopefully and honest one please let me say this. Probably like many others whetherornot on a forum or in daily life. Yes to find someone may disagree with you, can raise the hackles. Is it worth worrying about. NO.
                    Please believe me. I have always considered your vast gardening know-how to be of great value, and Verdun also knows so much. At times we may not see eye to eye but this opens up the way to further discussion, not a falling out.
                    I feel that you may have misunderstood my comment about staking. OK I know these plants are not included. I simply mentioned what I did as being the general practice. This type of plant is usually, when planting small plants, here the custom is to plant in groups of 3s or 5s. so that as the plants grow,they bond together and form a greater root formation. Other times such plants are used as 'Dot' plants. As in beds of smaller plants, so as to give an attractive appearance.
                    So now then. ' Young Sheal' stop all this. You are well liked and loved on the forum and, I for one truly value your input. Now lass, go and put kettle on.
                     
                  • wiseowl

                    wiseowl Friendly Owl ADMIN Staff Member

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                    Good morning I think it is all about knowing your own Garden,Soil,location and and where the sun and shade fall ect ,so would I stake or dig it up ,as you are situated in Northumberland and given the factors that you have given us,I would respectfully suggest that you stake it.enjoy your day my friend:smile:

                    My neighbour once had the same problem and I said to him dig it up ,a week later it was dead,and he said to me,in future I will only ask you about Roses:lunapic 130165696578242 5:
                     
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