1. THE MAY PHOTO COMP IS OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS COME AND JOIN IN..
    Dismiss Notice

Moving house (or rather, garden). Help please?

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by CarolineL, Jun 25, 2018.

  1. CarolineL

    CarolineL Super Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2016
    Messages:
    445
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Retired Software engineer
    Location:
    Rural Carmarthenshire
    Ratings:
    +1,015
    Dear friends
    I am intending to move back near family in Wales after I retire in a couple of months. As a very keen gardener (2 greenhouses and polytunnel, borders too full to plant more), I have lots of plants in pots that I want to take, and probably cuttings/divisions of some things from the borders.
    I am very naive about this, as I haven't moved house for over 25 years. How do movers handle pots (including big glazed ones)? Do you need to pack them into crates?
    And how soon ahead of moving would you start taking cuttings, dividing? I have some rather nice specimens of trees (a great acer griseum, betula jacquemontii) of which I want to root cuttings.
    I'm looking for good advice from any of you that have moved house recently please!
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Sheal

      Sheal Total Gardener

      Joined:
      Feb 2, 2011
      Messages:
      29,105
      Gender:
      Female
      Location:
      Mid Inverness-shire
      Ratings:
      +33,375
      I moved house but my things had to go into storage for a while. So not being able to take plants with me I can't help you with this. However, @Trunky moved about the same time so may be able to give you some advice, if he would be so kind. :)
       
    • NigelJ

      NigelJ Total Gardener

      Joined:
      Jan 31, 2012
      Messages:
      1,771
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Mad Scientist
      Location:
      Paignton Devon
      Ratings:
      +5,545
      @CarolineL
      Last time I moved (20 years ago) I moved my potted plants myself, as removers were not keen.
      They can't stack plants like furniture.
      If the glazed pots were empty and could be bubble wrapped or crated they should be fine with the removers.
      As for the potted plants I would hire a van and rope in friends or relatives to help.
      I thought about moving a lot more plants, but I didn't have a property to move to at the time. Also Essex and Devon have different climates so I took the hard decision to start again when I got settled apart from a few specials.
      Also make sure your buyers know which plants you'll be taking.
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
      • silu

        silu gardening easy...hmmm

        Joined:
        Oct 20, 2010
        Messages:
        3,682
        Gender:
        Female
        Location:
        Igloo
        Ratings:
        +8,067
        Hi @CarolineL I did pretty much what you are wanting to do about 17 years ago.
        I moved house and as much of my garden as I could take came with me. I sold my old house to the owner of a huge garden centre who had zero interest in plants! so no problem with what I wanted to take other than as you would expect I left the garden tidy and filled in the holes where I had removed plants. Nigel is right tho you should ask the buyer if they have any objection to you taking things. Bits of herbaceous shouldn't be an issue but if like me who took whole shrubs then best to ask.
        I 100% agree with Nigel re doing a DIY job of moving plants. Removers often won't take "dirty" plants and see no value in them so could care less.
        I used a horse trailer that I had and moved over 400 pots of herbaceous plants plus 12 Rhododendrons and Azaleas plus a lovely Japanese Acer which was substantial but not too big to take the move.If you are planning a large move of plants start collecting as big as you can find flower pots. Often nurseries and garden centres will give them away for nothing. I painted numbers on my pots and them kept a log of what was in what. Vital with herbaceous when taking off the top growth to make the move easy. Of all the plants I moved I lost precisely 1:). I still remember it was the very nice variety I had of Euparorium (I have a bit of "the lost sheep and shepherd" mentality with plants:rolleyespink:.
        It was hard work but worth it. I would hate to think how much it would have cost me financially and in time to collect so many different plants again. My neighbour where I live now thought I was setting up a commercial nursery! as the mountain of pots of plants grew with numerous trips with the trailer before we had actually moved here (agreed with sellers to bring plants here pre removal).
        You may find the Acer Grisium and Betula Jacquemontii are grafted and therefore I don't think root cuttings would work? Personally as it would take ages for root cuttings to become decent trees I'd treat myself to new ones especially the Acer Grisium as in my experience it is pretty slow growing with me anyway. The perfect gift for a friend to give you as a house warming present maybe:). Sadly I left 5 Jaquemontii, an Acer Grisium along with perhaps 20 lovely Sorbus plus many other trees all of which were ripped out to make a football pitch at my old house...note to self never go back and see an old garden !'d created!
         
        • Informative Informative x 2
        • shiney

          shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

          Joined:
          Jul 3, 2006
          Messages:
          41,316
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired - Last Century!!!
          Location:
          Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
          Ratings:
          +67,155
          You definitely need to bear in mind what is said to the purchasers. Unless you state, when dealing with the purchasers, that you shall be taking plants with you it becomes part of the sale. Your estate agent should advise you on that.

          Even if the removers are able to move pot plants I wouldn't trust them (sorry, Mr Remover :noidea:) unless they say that moving plants is what they often do and that they are insured for it.

          As an aside:- never agree to give the job to a remover if they won't give you a copy of their insurance details (you also need to see their certificate). This is also something that should be done when employing any contractor. Builders, decorators etc. I've dealt with too many cases where damage has been caused and the contractor wasn't insured and refused to do anything.
           
        Loading...

        Share This Page

        1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
          By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
          Dismiss Notice