Pruning a large Hebe

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by luciusmaximus, Oct 18, 2019.

  1. luciusmaximus

    luciusmaximus Total Gardener

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    I've got a Hebe that's been battered by storms and looking a little sorry for itself. Would it hurt to prune it back now ? I know it's usually spring for pruning but don't know if I should wait.
     
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    • Upsydaisy

      Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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      I'm interested too on this ....eagerly awaiting on an answer :blue thumb:
       
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      • glengarry23

        glengarry23 Gardener

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        The best time to prune a Hebe is after it has flowered,..however your circumstances are different,..they seldom need a lot of pruning but best to keep them in some sort of shape rather than scraggy,..early Spring is a good time as well,..with very cold Winters its best to have any pruning done before the really cold weather arrives to give new growth a fighting chance to survive.

        Were it me i would do some pruning seeing your Hebe has been battered,..it would help the Hebe to save its energy trying to keep alive battered and damaged branches and start new growth.

        Philip
         
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        • luciusmaximus

          luciusmaximus Total Gardener

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          Thanks for the advice Philip :). When it stops raining I'll take a picture.
           
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          • glengarry23

            glengarry23 Gardener

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            @luciusmaximus ,..looking forward to seeing the Hebe,..i have a few myself,..three or four,..beautiful foliage on all and the bonus of course are the blooms.

            Philip
             
          • Mike Allen

            Mike Allen Total Gardener

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            Pruning can cover a wide field. Perhaps basically and as a starting point. Pruning entails cutting back, thinning out and trimming to make the subject look good.

            Perhaps when pruning shrubs and semi-shrubs. It starts out cosmetic. However shrubs semi or otherwise. It has to be realised that the further inwards you go. The less the foliage. So simply, concentrate your pruning on, cutting out old stems, wood. If you neglect this. In time you will have perhaps a very large specimen consisting of a vast tangle of branches etc and a spattering of leave and flowers on the outside. In particular. When tending the outer,tips of the plant. Cut back if you can to between a pair of leaves. This will aviod having lots of dead ended stems on show. The idea of pruning following flowering simply is. First enjou the flowers and then get cutting.

            Pruning trees and fruit trees. Here the idea is to keep the crown of the tree open. Get rid of weak branches and those crossing over. An old practice. Having pruned a tree, fruit or otherwise. You should be able to stand back and throw your cap through the middle. Of course with fruit trees, pruning also includes reconising fruit buds and pruning as such.
             
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            • shiney

              shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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              I think you can prune it OK now if you're going to be frost free for a while. The battered parts could take a pruning. It also depends on how large it is.

              With my large ones I take the hedge cutter to them. :rolleyespink: Did it a couple of weeks ago.

              P1390772.JPG
               
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