Self sown apple tree

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Sienna's Blossom, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. Sienna's Blossom

    Sienna's Blossom Super Gardener

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    We noticed a tree growing in amongst our border last summer, we think it's an apple tree, and we do have an apple tree already so thought it may have been from that.

    We left it there last year, but it can't stay there, there'd be no room.

    We will be attempting to dig it up soon, but what do we do with it?

    Treat it like a weed and put it in the green bin?! Just seems a bit heartless, when it's took the trouble to grow unnoticed by us for years! It's about 3-4ft tall, but was so hidden by the other mature shrubs.

    But if it is a self sown Apple it could get huge couldn't it?

    What will be the fate of this little tree? What would you do?
     
  2. Redwing

    Redwing Wild Gardener

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    The chances are that it will take a long time to fruit and will probably not be very good. New apple tree varieties are usually bred by persevering and patient horticulturalists who have many many failures to their few successes. They patiently pollinate know varieties with other known varieties in the hopes of striking lucky. Having said that the Bramley was a seedling grown by a young girl about 100 years ago and there is an outside chance that your seedling could be as good as that. Seedlings take around seven years to fruit so you’re half way there. Pot it up and coddle it if you are so inclined but don’t bet on it being a winner. And yes, it probably will get huge in time. If you know what your tree is, you will know one of the parents but you will never know the other one. Good luck.
     
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    • Sienna's Blossom

      Sienna's Blossom Super Gardener

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      Thanks @Redwing , I quite like that idea because I just don't think I have the heart to discard it.

      First obstacle to overcome will be managing to dig it up unharmed..... We will try our very best.

      :fingers crossed:
       
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      • Redwing

        Redwing Wild Gardener

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        Now, while it is dormant, is the time to dig it up and replant.
         
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        • misterQ

          misterQ Keen Gardener

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          Potting on the apple tree sucker prunings is what I did too (in autumn 2017).
          [​IMG]

          [​IMG]


          My aim was to produce rootstock for some grafting experiments.

          I didn't have much scion material to work with being from slow growing columnar apples but I did manage to produce two grafted trees.

          Since you have the rootstock and an abundance of scion material, why not have a go at grafting. Even if the graft fails, the rootstock won't die off so easily and it will still produce plenty of side branches given enough time.
           
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          • Sienna's Blossom

            Sienna's Blossom Super Gardener

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          • Selleri

            Selleri Super Gardener

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            We had two "spit" apple trees at Nana's place, they grew from the seeds my dad and her sister spat out when sitting on the wall and eating apples when they were kids. :)

            40 years after the spitting, the trees were beautiful as apple trees are. The fruit were disappointing but edible.
             
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            • misterQ

              misterQ Keen Gardener

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              Four days ago.
              [​IMG]

              [​IMG]

              [​IMG]


              Just to show that it does produce fruit - good sized Granny Smith-type apples.
               
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              • healthfreak101

                healthfreak101 Apprentice Gardener

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                I would move it and sow the tree where it will be in no one' way.
                 
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