Sheds

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Fat Controller, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. Fat Controller

    Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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    I don't have guttering, and to be honest I don't know if I would be able to fit them now - at least, not at the side which is right next to the greenhouse.

    The shed is screwed down to the base, and then I have (in my attempts to seal things) have sprayed a bead of expanding foam around the inside, and then of course there is the paint on the outside. To make matters worse, not long after the saga started, I made quite a significant plunge cut in the metal part at the front of the door, purely to drain the water away that was sitting in there.

    Not sure if we could move it or not - I'd be concerned that it would twist or collapse inward when lifted off the base, especially as the bottom door runner has a bloomin' great hole in it. In all fairness, I think if this shed comes off the base, it is all only heading to the local tip - and all I could then do is turn the greenhouse into a shed (black out the windows etc).
     
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    • shiney

      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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      As most of you know, I'm useless at DIY so can't really be of help. I do have a metal shed and never have any problems re damp or condensation.

      The base is slightly different with mine. The walls are built onto a metal framework. We put this framework directly onto the paving slabs. The floor was then built inside the shed using marine ply. So none of the floor is exposed outside and it's not actually touching the slabs. Just to make it a bit easier I got some old offcuts of lino and laid that on the ply.

      We have no condensation but there is enough ventilation between the roof and the walls and no holes have been filled. :noidea:

      you're welcome to have a good look at it if you come to Open Day. :dbgrtmb:
       
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      • Marley Farley

        Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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        Well I have read all the way through this thread again @Fat Controller and to be honest I think you are just going to be throwing more money at it and still run the risk of no improvement after all your expense and efforts..

        Does your shed have to be that size? If it doesn’t why not downsize and get something you can afford more easily..
        this looks a great deal and has its own floor and ventilation.. As ling as you vent it, it should be fine..

        Wayfair.co.uk - Shop Furniture, Lighting, Homeware & More Online
         
      • Fat Controller

        Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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        Sadly @Marley Farley - we do need something that sort of size as a minimum (in fact we struggle a bit with this one!), simply due to the stuff that we have to store in it, including jack, axle stands, socket sets, tool boxes, lawn mower, scarifier, vac/blower, shredder, strimmer and a whole lot more. I think ours is the only house on the street that hasn't been extended, so we have zero space in the house itself - and now the whole situation is being made worse as there is some things that I would normally have stored in the loft, but I cannot get up into the loft any longer.
         
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        • Marley Farley

          Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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          • Fat Controller

            Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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            I like your thinking, but I wouldn't be able to get into one of them if they were back to back - and that is 20sq ft less than the current option. At £600, it would feel like quite an expensive bodge if you know what I mean?
             
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            • Marley Farley

              Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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              No worries. Like I said a stupid thought. Nothing going second hand in your local paper not wood? :scratch:
               
            • Fat Controller

              Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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              Not sure - next weekend we intend to clear out the greenhouse and start moving stuff from the shed into the greenhouse, then we can have a go at lifting part of the floor in the shed; that will let us see what we are up against, and then we go from there.
               
            • Doghouse Riley

              Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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              As I've mentioned before, the quality of the wood used in pretty much everything "wooden" made, is a bit like "forced rhubarb." It's timber from "sustainable forests." So lacks density and is likely to rot, unlike pitch pine which was used for Victorian window frames, many of which in houses of that era are still in good condition.
              I think there is also variable quality in anything described as "Tanilised" or "pressure treated." I'm sure some don't get much more than a "coat of looking at."
              Same with Waneylap fences. The 4ft fence panels between ours and the neighbouring semi's side drive are now the best part of fifty years old, have had no subsequent treatment, but are still just about "hanging on." Several of those in the fence I erected in our back garden had to be changed after fifteen years.

              With any shed, I believe you have to get it up off the ground by about six inches, as is our tea-house I built of reclaimed softwood and roofing ply panels. I think it better to have some sort of protection that covers the surface, like my mahogany exterior Woodsheen, or a similar polymer paint, rather than stuff that's supposed to sink in.

              To disguise the fact that this building is off the ground, supported on brick piers on pavingstones, it has "skirts" made from Victorian style skirting boards that are two inches clear of the surrounding path. The "fall" of the path is away from the building and the overhang of the roof keeps some rain off the sides. There's enough clearance for me to get a long pressure spray lance under the skirts to give the underside a spray of clear Cuprinol every five years or so.

              You can just about see the gap in this photo. As there's no skirt at the back it gets plenty of air circulation underneath.

              P1050883.JPG

              Thirty-two years on this year, there's no rot. I've forgotten how many coats of Woodsheen it's had over the years, but it was certainly worth it. It got three coats after I finished it.

              Here after one coat thirty-two years ago. Over the years with subsequent applications it's become a really deep brown.

              06_10_11.JPEG


              I never painted the underside of the roof, just a coat of Cuprinol and nothing since, as it's out of the weather it still looks like this. It looks a bit flimsy but the whole roof will take my 12st when I'm up there painting the top.
               
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                Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
              • pete

                pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                I'm looking at this now and it appears the shed sides go down onto the DPC material?
                The DPC is achieving nothing, if that is the case?, other than directing the water from the roof, (no gutter), and the sides straight inside.

                The sides of the shed should overhang the base allowing the water to drain away.

                In short the base should not be bigger than the shed sides.:smile:
                 
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                • Fat Controller

                  Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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                  Aye, that be the problem for sure - really puzzling as the instructions from Yardmaster were quite explicit in that the base should be larger than the dimensions of the shed.

                  What are my chances of a repair working, if I were to slerk the sides with that roof repair paint to seal them? Or is the damage done, do you think?

                  Even bodging it like that is going to skin me £200+, which I will do if it is going to actually seal the thing and I can get another couple of years out of it.
                   
                • pete

                  pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                  I'm not familiar with metal sheds so my comments are based on wooden ones, the sides of the shed boarding traditionally would always overhang the floor.
                  The floor would be suspended on timbers, (sleepers) , so the whole thing is off the ground.
                  I'd not spend any more money on it.

                  It's probably too much for you at the moment, I know, but the whole thing needs taking away, a new floor making, built up off the paving and making sure the sides of the shed actually "shed" the water.
                  At the moment it doesn't matter what you do it will always leach under the sides, the DPC is actually not helping, its just making the problem worse IMO.
                   
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                  • ricky101

                    ricky101 Super Gardener

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                    Seems there are a good few ytubes on those Yardmaster sheds and even the newly built ones report leaks !

                    This one shows how he fixed the leaks around the base with does seem reasonably easy to do, one side at a time by using some wedges to hold it up enough to get the membrane under.

                    As it goes over and down the edge of the base it would seem to negate need for a roof gutter.

                    Better not mention how you have half covered the house drain cover !:whistle:

                     
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                    • Sheal

                      Sheal Total Gardener

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                      • pete

                        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                        That is interesting, apart from the gap I noticed where there is a bracket holds in the shed to the floor, a gap in the membrane, apart from obvious joins that are bound to be required, as you cant go round the whole base in one.
                        It is only a stop gap, and probably the big problem with metal sheds, they are only really a place to put the mower and a few gardening implements, not really for storage of other stuff.
                         
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