Transplanting cyclamen

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Jack Sparrow, Dec 29, 2019.

  1. Jack Sparrow

    Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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    I know cyclamen is a subject I have touched on before. A random thought occured to me today (as they often do). A bit of research told me that what I wanted to do wasn't practical. That then gave me another idea.

    I currently have this:
    20191229_132609.jpg

    This is a very difficult area to work with because the tree roots or so close to the soil. Already in there are clumps of snowdrops, daffodils and maybe the odd aconite. There is also a very healthy hardy geranium.

    I was thinking that the addition of cyclamen might enhance the look of this area an add seasonal interest.

    The cyclamen I currently possess look like this:
    20191229_132551.jpg
    20191229_132540.jpg

    I have no idea what varieties they are.

    My thoughts were, that I could wait until all my spring bulbs appear and then try to plant cyclamen in the gaps. I have no idea how practical this idea is. Any help/advice would be appreciated.

    G.
     
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    • Palustris

      Palustris Total Gardener

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      The ones you have there are C. persicum which are on the tender side. You need C hederifolium and or C. coum for your scheme which by the way should work really well.
       
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      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        I've got Hederifolium, only planted a couple years ago, it's really surprising where they come up these days, often miles away from the parent plants.

        Although they flower late summer or early autumn the winter leaves are good to look at at a dull time of the year.
        I was thinking of getting some coum, as I think I'm right in saying they flower in the spring, but would like to be corrected on that if I'm wrong:smile:

        DSC_0510.JPG
         
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        • Jack Sparrow

          Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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          Will I be able to get hederifolium at this time of year? It will be easier to do in the spring when I can see where I need to be.

          G.
           
        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          Well, personally I think planting cyclamen while in growth is probably the best way to go if you can get pot grown plants.
          In late spring they go dormant and die back to the tuber, so I dont think that would be a good time.

          I'm guessing late summer or early autumn would have been best.
           
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          • Jack Sparrow

            Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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            If I'm organised enough I can do what I did elsewhere. I can insert labels to show where the spring bulbs come up. That way, come Autumn, I will still be able to see where to go.

            G.
             
          • CarolineL

            CarolineL Total Gardener

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            Hi @Jack Sparrow you should be able to get cyclamen at the moment from a nursery - my c. hederifolium are in full leaf at the moment, and c. coum is coming on too. If you are careful when trying to make a hole for them (to avoid damaging your other plants) you should be able to get them in now. Small plants should transplant well - though the corms get to the size of dinnerplates eventually!
             
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            • Mike Allen

              Mike Allen Total Gardener

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              Cyclamen.
              Sowbread.

              Primulaceae.

              Believed to be around 19 species.
              Root type. Tuberous.
              From seed sown as soon as ripe and in the dark. 14-18 months, and your new plants should be flowering. Smaller species best for rock gardens etc. Hardiness, fully hardy to frost tender. Potted/container grown. Be careful with watering. As with most corms, the corms are always subject to rotting. However. C. Parviflorum & C. Purpurascens must never be allowed to dry out.

              As already mentioned by Caroline. Corms of some species, especially C. Hederifolium can overtime become large. Perhaps not often practiced but well worth a try. As new season growth starts. The corm can in a way resemble a seed potato. New shoots appear. Using a clean sharp knife, the corm can be cut into half or even into three, make sure each piece has a growing shoot. Dust the cut surfaces with flowers of sulphur, leave to dry for a few minutes, then pot up.
               
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