What jobs are we doing in the garden today 2016

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Fat Controller, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. Sian in Belgium

    Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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    Don't start me on the washing!! We were next to the north Finistere coast - experience has shown that all clothes become damp after more than a week, even if they are never worn. I think we did 5 loads of washing on the Sunday, after checking that rain would not arrive until 6pm. When it started at 3pm....:th scifD36:
     
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      Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
    • Kandy

      Kandy Will be glad to see the sun again soon.....

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      What I can't understand @Sian in Belgium is that we spent two weeks in shorts and T shirts and Mr Kandy only put a waterproof top on once (I refused as I didn't want to encourage the rain:snorky:) but it has taken me quiet a few hours of ironing the stuff yesterday and I have just about finished today.I expect it is the fact that I had a clean T shirt on every day plus changed my shorts every few days and changed my socks and undergarments every day,whereas Mr Kandy got away with a clean shirt every two days and refused to change his shorts for a clean pair:yikes: When you have humid weather it makes your clothes wet just with walking about:biggrin: I have given up with watching the weather forecast as they always get it wrong:biggrin:

      As we now use quilts in the van I have had the covers to wash plus pillowslips and fitted sheets and come the weekend all the bedding at home and the towels will all need washing:phew:

      I shall have to Google Finistere coast as I am not quiet sure where that is and I like to educate myself from time to time:snork:

      No gardening today as everywhere is wet now after the early morning rain although the sun is shining and we have a bit of windy weather:biggrin:
       
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      • shiney

        shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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        We're still cutting back and are nearly two months ahead of normal. :blue thumb:

        That's all because of a combination of things. The drought has cause a lot of things to either go into winter mode or die. As it has been so dry I haven't needed to cut the lawns much and have only done them once since June (main lawn cut twice). So I've had more time to do other things. The only digging and weeding that I've been able to do has been in the veg patch where we had to use the sprinkler regularly. The weeds seem to have had no trouble growing :doh: but the ground in the flower beds is much too hard for digging.

        One area of a bed that we want to revamp needs three 50 year old shrubs to be removed (Philadelphus and Deutzia) so Mrs Shiney put the sprinkler on that bed yesterday evening. Then it rained heavily for about ten minutes. I've been out there this morning but the ground is still too hard to dig. The detailed weather map is showing a lot of rain in this area today :hapydancsmil: but showing that it may miss us :sad:. That probably guarantees that we shall get it :heehee:
         
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        • Loofah

          Loofah Admin Staff Member

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          Nothing. It's been wet and I'm feeling rubbish after my little bundle of joy gave me her cold!
           
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          • ARMANDII

            ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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            Kids are so generous........they like to share things.:dunno::heehee::sick0026:
             
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            • Sian in Belgium

              Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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              Yesterday was a momentous day....

              In the morning, we wandered around the garden, sampling the apples from the fruit trees!!

              * Hereford Russet (a relatively new russet) - a lovely typical russet flavour, without the slightly tough skin :dbgrtmb:
              * Lord Lambourne - still to be sampled, the 2 windfalls were indoors, the remaining 2 not quite ready for picking
              Gloster 69 - not a huge amount of flavour, but crisp and juicy. Unfortunately had been damaged by hail storm in May...:blue thumb:
              Braeburn - a little more flavour than the Gloster 69, but quite similar ( I know, early for the apple, but it was a damaged fruit, so had ripened a little prematurely):blue thumb:
              * Laxton's Superb - sweet, tasty, yumsk :dbgrtmb:
              * Schone van Boskoop (Belle de Boskoop) - tart, without being sour, loads of flavour, a brilliant dual purpose flavour, won't need too much sugar when cooking :dbgrtmb:

              * year old maiden trees, planted this last winter!!


              We are very happy people!!
               
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              • shiney

                shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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                Well done @Sian in Belgium :dbgrtmb:

                We don't know what some of our apple trees are :dunno:. One is a Cox's and two are Bramleys. The bottom part of our garden was originally a part of an orchard and the house, built afterwards, has been here for almost 65 years. So our fruit trees are likely to be well over 70 years old and anything up to 100 years old (when the orchard was started here).

                All of the trees came from Thomas Rivers and Co. (were just down the road when we first moved here) which was started in 1725. Some of them we have tried to get identified but neither Rivers or the RHS were able to work out some of them. We only have five unidentified trees surviving. The pears are identified and my favourite, a Conference Pear, was first developed by Thomas Rivers and named in 1885 after it won the National British Pear Conference in London.
                 
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                • Trunky

                  Trunky ...who nose about gardening

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                  Got a few jobs done yesterday. Pulled out the runner beans and stored the canes away for another year, chopped up the last of the sweet corn plants and added them to the compost heap.

                  Had a bit of a sort out in the greenhouse, removed most of the spent tomato plants, emptied out some large pots in which I'd grown cucumbers and basil, refilled them and sowed the first of the winter salad leaves.
                   
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                  • David E Peacock

                    David E Peacock Gardener

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                    Yesterday I concentrated on clearing a bed of Antirrhinums which were past their best.
                    Then putting a layer of last years compost over the surface and planting up with Dwarf Wallflowers (Persian Carpet) with Mixed Darwin Tulips in between. A friend mentioned that I may be a little early in planting the Tulips, but I feel it should be ok.
                    Time will tell . .

                    Today I intend to prepare the planting positions and plant two new Rhododendron plants in pots (the names currently elude me, may add them later) . .
                    My planting areas are neutral (from a soil test: 6ph) so I intend to try and improve the planting areas by adding lots of leaf mould . . .
                     
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                    • shiney

                      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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                      @David E Peacock

                      Hi David, a ph of 6 is slightly acid and would be good for ericaceous plants but not good for most others. If you can get it up closer to 6.5 then you can have the best of both worlds. Once you get above 6.5 the ericaceous plants will suffer.
                       
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                      • NigelJ

                        NigelJ Total Gardener

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                        Trying to salvage a shrub that has just decided it isn't happy where it is (after two years).
                        Dead heading, weeding, planting out wallflowers and Sweet Williams for next year, planting a couple of allium bulbs and picking some of the apples and pears. Ashmead Kernel and Pitmaston Pineapple have done well this year.
                         
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                        • Phil A

                          Phil A Guest

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                          Was getting on great till me fork snapped :doh:

                          DSCI0053.JPG
                           
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                          • Trunky

                            Trunky ...who nose about gardening

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                            Lovely sunny day here with a cooling breeze, so I got a few more jobs done. :)

                            Planted out a couple of dozen 'Marathon' autumn calabrese. It's a bit late in the season, I only sowed the seeds at the end of August, but they're a fairly fast growing hybrid variety, so with a mild autumn and a bit of care I should still get some heads before the end of the year. :fingers crossed:

                            Also mowed the lawn and fed all the pots and containers.
                             
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                            • Phil A

                              Phil A Guest

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                              Sis now says she don't want a concrete pour and that she just wants it gravelled :gaah:

                              Sowed Lambs lettuce and lollo rosso in the cold frame and now drinkin a lot :Wino:
                               
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                              • David E Peacock

                                David E Peacock Gardener

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                                @shiney

                                I am trying a Miracle-gro slow release product (granules)which is applied once a year and suitable for both new and existing ericaceous plants!
                                Will comment in the future as to how it performs . . .
                                 
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