Winter shrub/bush/tree for front garden.

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by miraflores, Nov 19, 2019.

  1. Nikolaos

    Nikolaos Super Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2019
    Messages:
    455
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Midlands, UK
    Ratings:
    +768
    The Winter/Spring ones generally seem to have a richer, more captivating fragrance to my nose. Another nice thing about my fragrantissima is that it will be covered with bumblebees in a few weeks! :blue thumb: Last year there were so many on it that I could barely see the flowers. :heehee: If you think about it, these rather large shrubs give the same benefit that a small drift of herbaceous perennials do to pollinators.

    I naively thought mezereum would cope well but it was the worst performer in my heavy clay. "After all, it's a native species, should do well" I thought. Very flawed reasoning that, it popped it's clogs just after flowering! :wallbanging::heehee: Then I gave transatlantica 'Eternal Fragrance' a go, not much better really. Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' did best (almost lasted a year, wow! :roflol:) so what with "Rebbeca" being so closely related to it I'm seriously tempted. I wasn't familiar with 'Perfume Princess' but T&M call it "the world's most fragrant" shrub. Quite a claim, that! :biggrin:

    Daphne 'Perfume Princess' plants | Thompson & Morgan

    I'd heard of that Osmanthus species before but didn't realise it was pollinator-friendly! Might add that one to my front garden. Choisya ternata seriously struggled in my soil but was replaced by dewitteana 'White Dazzler' which absolutely thrived in it for years. Well, until I had too many glasses of Chardonnay one Summer evening and ended up stepping onto its central stem, snapping it in half! :wallbanging: My mate actually 'rescued' that one by simply binding the stem together with a bit of cloth, and it's now performing beautifully in one of his large containers! Tremendously robust shrubs, choisyas. :smile:

    Nick
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
      Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
    • ARMANDII

      ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

      Joined:
      Jan 12, 2019
      Messages:
      43,589
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +88,663
      Which would mean, Nick, that you would be spending most of your time in the front garden once you get the first drift of scent from the Osmanthus in your nostrils.:heehee: Thousands of tiny flowers but such a powerful sweet scent.:love30:

      Agreed, mine is near the East corner of the garden, Nick, in light shade and I think we bought it back in the mid 80's and is still going strong. I do have to prune it back every now and then when it decides to take over more territory but the scent is beautiful.:cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • miraflores

        miraflores Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Apr 16, 2006
        Messages:
        5,480
        Location:
        mean daily minimum temperatures -1 -2
        Ratings:
        +2,387
        What would you suggest?
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Funny Funny x 1
        • redstar

          redstar Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Aug 6, 2008
          Messages:
          6,156
          Gender:
          Female
          Occupation:
          Full time-Service Director -Human Services.
          Location:
          Chester County, PA, USA, Plant zone 4 & 5
          Ratings:
          +8,122
          I would have to do some research, google about, get a tree book from the library and look at listings on line, see what the Birds like to eat. plot down the size type when grown, color comparison to my other plantings, etc. Part of finding the process is what you discover as your searching, can't take that away from you now can I.
           
          • Agree Agree x 1
          Loading...

          Share This Page

          1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
            By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
            Dismiss Notice